Session 11 October 2014

RedFox

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Q: (L) Okay. Hmm. Well, that doesn't help me at all, does it? Was there anything remarkable about Caesar's birth?

A: Comet.

Q: (L) So there was a comet at the time of his birth, and that was the main thing. A comet at his birth, and a comet at his death. Is that it?

A: Yes.

Q: (L) But, no “laid in the manger” business, no wise men, nothing like that.

A: No.

Q: (Pierre) But the comets meant something. It was not only random chance, was it?

(L) But all the stuff about Jesus and the manger and being born in a cave or whatever...

(Perceval) Well, how long was the comet in the sky, and how many were born at the same time?

(Pierre) But an individual having a comet at his birth and at his death...

(L) Is kind of special. I mean, look at Mark Twain!

(Perceval) But how many people were born at that time? It doesn't necessarily relate to Caesar. If it was there in the sky for a week or two weeks, then you've got hundreds of people being born with the comet in the sky. But from a human point of view, people took it as a sign...

A: Receivership capability!

Q: (L) So there can be hundreds of people born with the emanations of a comet in the atmosphere, but only the one that has the receivership capability would be affected or influenced by it?

A: Yes


Q: (L) So it can be very important, but only for...

Just reminded me of
http://cassiopaea.org/cass/Laura-Knight-Jadczyk/article-lkj-04-03-06.htm
One thing I would like to draw the reader's attention to is Jessup's reference to Jupiter. As it happens, I'm rather fond of Jupiter for a number of reasons. Those readers who have read the story of the Cassiopaean Experiment are aware that the breakthrough in the experiment that resulted in the superluminal communication from "Us in the Future" came at the exact moment the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy began to impact the surface of Jupiter

So a reminder....
Laura said:
'Junk' DNA proves functional

In a paper published in Genome Research on Nov. 4, scientists at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) report that what was previously believed to be "junk" DNA is one of the important ingredients distinguishing humans from other species.

More than 50 percent of human DNA has been referred to as "junk" because it consists of copies of nearly identical sequences. A major source of these repeats is internal viruses that have inserted themselves throughout the genome at various times during mammalian evolution.

Using the latest sequencing technologies, GIS researchers showed that many transcription factors, the master proteins that control the expression of other genes, bind specific repeat elements. The researchers showed that from 18 to 33% of the binding sites of five key transcription factors with important roles in cancer and stem cell biology are embedded in distinctive repeat families.

Over evolutionary time, these repeats were dispersed within different species, creating new regulatory sites throughout these genomes. Thus, the set of genes controlled by these transcription factors is likely to significantly differ from species to species and may be a major driver for evolution.

This research also shows that these repeats are anything but "junk DNA," since they provide a great source of evolutionary variability and might hold the key to some of the important physical differences that distinguish humans from all other species.

The GIS study also highlighted the functional importance of portions of the genome that are rich in repetitive sequences.

"Because a lot of the biomedical research use model organisms such as mice and primates, it is important to have a detailed understanding of the differences between these model organisms and humans in order to explain our findings," said Guillaume Bourque, Ph.D., GIS Senior Group Leader and lead author of the Genome Research paper.

"Our research findings imply that these surveys must also include repeats, as they are likely to be the source of important differences between model organisms and humans," added Dr. Bourque. "The better our understanding of the particularities of the human genome, the better our understanding will be of diseases and their treatments."

"The findings by Dr. Bourque and his colleagues at the GIS are very exciting and represent what may be one of the major discoveries in the biology of evolution and gene regulation of the decade," said Raymond White, Ph.D., Rudi Schmid Distinguished Professor at the Department of Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco, and chair of the GIS Scientific Advisory Board.

"We have suspected for some time that one of the major ways species differ from one another - for instance, why rats differ from monkeys - is in the regulation of the expression of their genes: where are the genes expressed in the body, when during development, and how much do they respond to environmental stimuli," he added.

"What the researchers have demonstrated is that DNA segments carrying binding sites for regulatory proteins can, at times, be explosively distributed to new sites around the genome, possibly altering the activities of genes near where they locate. The means of distribution seem to be a class of genetic components called 'transposable elements' that are able to jump from one site to another at certain times in the history of the organism. The families of these transposable elements vary from species to species, as do the distributed DNA segments which bind the regulatory proteins."

Dr. White also added, "This hypothesis for formation of new species through episodic distributions of families of gene regulatory DNA sequences is a powerful one that will now guide a wealth of experiments to determine the functional relationships of these regulatory DNA sequences to the genes that are near their landing sites. I anticipate that as our knowledge of these events grows, we will begin to understand much more how and why the rat differs so dramatically from the monkey, even though they share essentially the same complement of genes and proteins."

And what did the Cs say about it back in 2000???

Cs on 23 Sept 2000 said:
Q: Now, let me get to MY questions! You once said that the core of DNA is an as yet
undiscovered enzyme related to carbon. Is that correct?
A: Yes.
Q: Here in this book it says: "Evidence is accumulating that only a relatively small portion of the
DNA sequence is for so-called structural genes. Structural genes lead to the production of
protein. There are an estimated 50,000 structural genes with an average sized of approximately
5,000 base pairs, which then accounts for only 250 million of the estimated 3 billion base pairs.
What is the rest of the DNA for? Some of the DNA is so-called repetitive sequences, repeated
thousands of times. The function is unknown. The ALU, repeat, for instance, contains over
300,000 copies of the same 300 base pair sequence. Certainly this DNA is not junk and plays
some important role in the gene regulation chromosomal architecture or chromosomal replication.
Until 1977, it was thought that genes were single sequences of DNA that are coded into RNA and
then into protein. However, further study has shown greater complexity. It is now known that
there are pieces of DNA within a gene that are not translated into protein. These intervening
sequences, or INTRONS, are somewhat of a mystery, but appear to be a very common
phenomenon." Now, is this thing they are talking about, these INTRONS, are these the core that
you were talking about?
A: In part.
Q: What about this ALU repeat with over 300,000 copies of the same base pair sequence. What
is it?
A: Tribal unit.
Q: What is a tribal unit?
A: Sectionalized zone of significant marker compounds.
Q: What does this code for?
A: Physiological/spiritual union profile.
Q: Could you define "tribal" for me?
A: You define.
Q: What does the rest of the DNA code for that is not coding for structural genes. What else can
it be doing?
A: Truncated flow.
Q: Truncated flow of what?
A: Liquids.
Q: Liquids from where to where?
A: What is your sense?
Q: Well, what liquids?
A: Time for your input.
Q: Do some of these...
A: No. Not alright: we asked you a question!
Q: Okay. Truncated flow of liquids. I'm not even sure what that means. (A) Maybe something
was flowing and something cut it off and stopped it and it cannot be developed. It means that
something was cut. (L) Does truncated flow mean a flow of liquid that has been stopped?
A: Yes. Because of design alteration!
Q: Is this liquid that has been truncated a chemical transmitter?
A: Yes.
Q: And would this chemical transmitter, if it were allowed to flow, cause significant alterations
in other segments of the DNA?
A: Yes.
Q: So, there is a segment of code that is in there, that is deliberately inserted, to truncate this flow
of liquid, which is a chemical transmitter, or neuropeptide, which would unlock significant
portions of our DNA?
A: Close Biogenetic engineering.
Q: I assume that this was truncated by the Lizzies and cohorts?
A: Close, but more likely Orion STS designers.
Q: Okay, can you tell us what this specific liquid or transmitter was truncated?
A: Think of the most efficient conductor of chemical compounds for low wave frequency charge.
Q: (A) Well, gold is one... (L) Acetylcholine?
A: No.
Q: (L) Water?
A: No.
Q: Saline?
A: Closer. It is a naturally bonding combination.
Q: (L) Well, I'll have to research it. The fact is, we've got 3 billion base pairs... do some of these
so-called segments of "junk DNA," if they were activated, would they instruct chromosomal
replication to take place with more than 23 pairs as a result?
A: In part.
Q: Is there anything we can do in terms of activities or...
A: No. Biogenetic engineering.
Q: Was my insight that I had one night that, at some point in time something may happen that
will turn genes on in our bodies that will cause us to physically transform, an accurate perception
of what could happen at the time of transition to 4th density?
A: For the most part, yes.
Q: Are there any limitations to what our physical bodies can transform to if instructed by the
DNA? Could we literally grow taller, rejuvenate, change our physical appearance, capabilities, or
whatever, if instructed by the DNA?
A: Receivership capability.
Q: What is receivership capability?
A: Change to broader receivership capability.
Q: (A) That means that you can receive more of something.
A: Close.
Q: (A) It means how good is your receiver.
A: Yes.
Q: (L) What is your receiver? The physical body?
A: Mind through central nervous system connection to higher levels.
Q: So, that is the whole issue of gaining knowledge and developing control over your
body. If your mind and CNS are tuned to higher levels of consciousness, that has
significance in terms of your receivership capability?
A: Close.

Laura said:
Q: (Manitoban) We've been teaching the EE class here for over three years, and we're just wondering if we've done any good? Not just for the participants, but have there been any nonlinear effects?

A: Indeed, and this is an interesting thing to contemplate: The necessity to work and continue to release energy into your realm so that it may accumulate, while not being attached to the visible outcome.

Q: (L) Well, that makes me think of a question to follow up on that. Something that's been on my mind is the difficulty so many group members have in getting themselves moving to do useful things, helpful things that help the network, help the group, help the Work, and to keep going. They sometimes get started, and then they peter out. Sometimes they try something too big, too much, too soon, too fast, and then they get discouraged. And I would like to know what is it about this group here that has made us able to put our noses to the grindstone for years and years... even under the most trying of circumstances. What is the quality that a person needs to be able to get - excuse me for saying this, but - to get their asses in gear, move, and keep moving? What is the needed quality?

A: Awakened conscience.

Q: (L) But how did we manage to get awakened consciences, and how can other people manage to do it, too?

A: Recall how you started, you acted on your own as the conscience of the world.

Q: (L) Well, what do you mean? How do you mean?

A: Recall why you began to try to see everything that was happening on your plane of existence.

Q: (L) You mean SOTT? My Signs of the Times?

A: Yes.

Q: (L) Well, the reason why was because I could see that other people were not remembering from one freakin' day to the next what happened! I mean, they needed to be reminded every day, day after day, what was happening.

A: And that is what developed your conscience. And those who helped were also in the process.

Q: (Andromeda) You have to constantly keep awake about what's happening.

(L) You have to get awake, you have to wake up, and you have to stay awake... all the time, about EVERYTHING. Any minute you allow yourself to sleep, you're putting your conscience to sleep. Dissociation is putting your conscience to sleep. Okay, that's all I wanted to ask about that. Go ahead.

(fabric) One thing we were worried about is in the event of a communications breakdown, would the board be able to be used to communicate with other groups? Like let's say the Château and the Tobacco House, to get a message across? Would that work if there was no power and no way of communicating with each other? Or would we just end up talking to dead dudes unless we grooved a channel?

A: Not likely and not advisable. We have mentioned before what is needed: Connect chakras by proper networking.

Q: (Perceval) Does that mean that essentially people who have their chakras connected by proper networking would essentially be inspired or moved to do what's needed to be done as a part of the network without necessarily having to be told?

A: And more. There will also be enhanced telepathic ability when the frequencies change. If you work on "receivership capability," all else will come naturally.

Q: (L) And how do you work on receivership capability?

A: Awakening conscience and tuning the centers as described by Mouravieff.
 

Ennio

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Turgon said:
I find this quote from Gurdjieff to be relevant when thinking about taking cold baths and showers.

Meetings With Remarkable Men said:
My father had in connection with my education certain definite, as I have called them, 'persistent pursuits.'
One of the most striking of these persistent pursuits of his, which later produced in me an indisputably beneficent result, acutely sensed by me and noticeable also to those with whom I came in contact during my wanderings in the various wilds of the earth in the search for truth, was that during my childhood, that is, at the age when there are formed in man the data for the impulses he will during during his responsible life, my father took measures on every suitable occasion so that there should be formed in me, instead of data engendering impulses such as fastidiousness, repulsion, squeamishness, fear, timidity, and so on, the data for an attitude of indifference to everything that usually evokes these impulses.

I remember very well how, with this aim in view, he would sometimes slip a frog, a worm, a mouse, or some other animal likely to evoke such impulses, into my bed, and would make me take non-poisonous snakes in my hands and even play with them, and so forth and so on.

Of all these persistent pursuits of his in relation to me, I remember that the one most worrying to the older people round me, for instance my mother, my aunt and our eldest shepherds, was that he always forced me to get up early in the morning, when a child's sleep is particularly sweet, and go to the fountain and splash myself all over with cold spring water, and afterwards to run about naked; and if I tried to resist he would never yield, and although he was very kind and loved me, he would punish me without mercy. I often remembered him for this in later years and in these moments thanked him with all my being.

If it had not been for this, I would never have been able to overcome all the obstacles and difficulties that I had to encounter later during my travels.

Reminds me of a recent article on SOTT which adds even more information to the benefits of cold showers and includes a nice little pep talk. For folks on the fence about doing the cold showers, this may help you to jump right in. Well at least gradually.

7 Reasons to take Cold showers and 1 that Really matters

Today, I could not turn the shower faucet to the right any further. Victory.

My first experience with cold showers was excited but short lived. Joel Runyon had a blog post and YouTube video discussing cold showers and how to begin. I was pumped and I gave it a try. I tried it, I yelped, I nearly peed myself, and then I stopped for a while.

It was too uncomfortable. I didn't want to replace hot, enjoyable showers with frigid, painful experiences. Despite all of the health benefits, I now know that being uncomfortable is exactly what cold showers are all about.

If health isn't high on your priority list, getting used to discomfort on a daily basis should be. By subjecting myself to discomfort now, I increase the likelihood I can stay the course in other areas of my life that are more important. Best of all, there are plenty of health benefits associated with cold shower therapy.

Living a Meaningful Life

Anyone who leads a meaningful life will attest to a few truths. In order to achieve anything, discomfort is going to play a massive role. Whether you are uncomfortably broke and have to borrow money to put gas in your car or if you experience discomfort asking the most beautiful woman on a date, purpose and meaning come with sacrifice.In many cases, the sacrifice is living with discomfort.

Conditioning your brain to accept, survive, and embrace discomfort is one of the practices that can greatly impact the rest of your life. Entrepreneurs, athletes and other professionals may consider cold shower therapy trivial when pursuing their goals, but don't miss out on the big picture. It isn't about the cold water. It's about the discomfort associated with cold showers, which you can overcome every day towards a greater goal in life.

No Way That is Healthy

If you have heard your parents' conventional wisdom growing up, you're probably not too fond of the cold. Supposedly, it can make you sick, but plenty of studies have showed this to be a myth. The truth, is that cold shower therapy is one of the healthiest modes for your body to regulate your internal temperature and it actually strengthens your immune system. It is considered a hormetic stressor, meaning that exposure to low level toxins can improve your health.

Improved blood circulation - showering with cold water is in going to improve your blood circulation between organs and skin considerably. With cold temperatures, blood flows to your organs for protection to keep them the warmest. Warm water sends the blood rushing to the skin so alternating between cold and hot (as I will detail later) can be a great way of improving your blood circulation. If you are just beginning, it might be best to stick to a cold shower only.

Improved mood - it is hard to quantify mood and indeed it is altered by many things. As my Unbalanced Brain series indicates, there are scientific reasons for many mood disorders. Cold showers can stimulate noradrenaline secretion in the brain, which is associated with improving mood disorders like depression.

Increased immune strength - unlike what your mother told you, spending time in the cold can actually increase your immune strength. Those who take cold showers typically exhibit higher white blood cell counts as well as higher concentrations of plasma, T helper cells, and lymphocytes.

Increased testosterone levels - I'm always looking for healthy and natural ways of increasing my testosterone levels. It's a boon in the gym, it makes me feel more motivated in general, and manipulating it naturally is the safest long term method I can think of. When I heard that cold showers can vastly increase testosterone production, I was even more thrilled. Not only is testosterone elevated during the shower, but throughout the day as well.

Metabolic advantages - from a body composition perspective, cold showers are also incredibly useful. The cold water induces an increased metabolic rate. The cold temperatures force your body to re-regulate the body temperature continually, which utilizes many calories. Mark mentions that an evolutionarily retained adaptation to cold water exposure is a layer of protective fat. Therefore, get your cold shower short and sweet and then get out. Longer exposure to cold therapy is not necessarily better.

Comment: Actually, in the Cassiopaean experiment (Session 30 August 2014) time was noted to play a role:
Q: (Carlisle) In the last session, you mentioned cold protocols as an aid to help fight off Ebola and strengthen the immune system. We were wondering what kind of temperature, duration, and frequency of cold exposure is optimal for this?

A: Ten to fifteen C, and same number of minutes. Daily is best initially, but four times weekly for maintenance. The approach can be gradual.

Better breathing - you may hyperventilate as soon as you get in a cold shower, which is a pretty natural response. However, the panic will only make the experience worse so it is in your best interest to breathe calmly and deeply. Few people breathe deeply so you may need cold showers to help you do so.

Make Your Life Easier

One of my favorite things to do is give actionable tips to get started. In this case, making it easier to take cold showers may be against the principle of increasing your acceptance of discomfort, but I'm going to give you some tips and practices anyway.

Big goals require discomfort to achieve - as soon as you make the realization that the goals you want to achieve most in your life are subject to discomfort, it should be an easy sell. The difference between making a good impression, standing your ground, and being successful could be altered by getting used to discomfort.

Joel's TEDx talk compares his decision to strike out as an entrepreneur to the experiences felt during a cold shower. It isn't going to be fun, it might be a bit scary, to many it seems stupid, but it's all a matter of discomfort.

It starts with day 1 - when I first considered cold showers one of my biggest fears was "for how long?" Do I need to take cold showers for the rest of my life? If you think about it, you will never get there. Just take it a day at a time. Get in the cold shower one day for a few minutes, get out, and you will be fine. Then do it the next day. It will get easier and easier so long as you can maintain the practice.

Don't try it gradually - unless you have health problems, I would not try to go from hot to cold over the course of your shower. In my experience, I forgot to get cold a lot of the times, in the hot water it is easy to talk yourself out of a cold shower, and partial immersion into cold shower therapy just doesn't seem to work. It might work for you, but based on my experience it is not an effective method.

[Note: it does work for me - lukewarm water to full on cold, but see for yourself what works best]

Work up a sweat first - I have the advantage of living in Austin, Texas so cold showers can be actually quite nice after the scorching heat of the southern United States. Nonetheless, you can even do this in colder climates by doing rigorous exercise or working up some sweat before you get in. It's a great way to cool off and it can also help prevent muscle soreness and fatigue after heavy weight lifting sessions.

Focus on your breath - you're going to get panicked, but it will only make things worse. Taking a cold shower is like quicksand. The faster you can accept what is happening and embrace it, the faster you can recover from the shock. This is one of the reasons I find cold shower therapy to be incredibly meditative. With maximum stimulation all around you, it is your job to maintain a steady focus and calmness with your breath and your focus. It helps to show how much you can actually block out with your mental capabilities. Now think about using this in an uncomfortable setting outside of the shower. Pretty helpful, huh?

What Are You Waiting For?

If you are dedicated to your aspirations and goals, taking a cold shower has profound tangible and mental benefits. Not only do you increase your physical health by taking cold showers, but you will build mental toughness in the face of extreme discomfort. By building discomfort resistance over many years, you will be ready when you need to be. Whether you are an athlete or an entrepreneur or anything that requires you to face and conquer fear, a cold shower is an easy win in the right direction.

And this video: _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlHZOb5Obbo
 

loreta

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Ennio said:
Turgon said:
I find this quote from Gurdjieff to be relevant when thinking about taking cold baths and showers.

Meetings With Remarkable Men said:
My father had in connection with my education certain definite, as I have called them, 'persistent pursuits.'
One of the most striking of these persistent pursuits of his, which later produced in me an indisputably beneficent result, acutely sensed by me and noticeable also to those with whom I came in contact during my wanderings in the various wilds of the earth in the search for truth, was that during my childhood, that is, at the age when there are formed in man the data for the impulses he will during during his responsible life, my father took measures on every suitable occasion so that there should be formed in me, instead of data engendering impulses such as fastidiousness, repulsion, squeamishness, fear, timidity, and so on, the data for an attitude of indifference to everything that usually evokes these impulses.

I remember very well how, with this aim in view, he would sometimes slip a frog, a worm, a mouse, or some other animal likely to evoke such impulses, into my bed, and would make me take non-poisonous snakes in my hands and even play with them, and so forth and so on.

Of all these persistent pursuits of his in relation to me, I remember that the one most worrying to the older people round me, for instance my mother, my aunt and our eldest shepherds, was that he always forced me to get up early in the morning, when a child's sleep is particularly sweet, and go to the fountain and splash myself all over with cold spring water, and afterwards to run about naked; and if I tried to resist he would never yield, and although he was very kind and loved me, he would punish me without mercy. I often remembered him for this in later years and in these moments thanked him with all my being.

If it had not been for this, I would never have been able to overcome all the obstacles and difficulties that I had to encounter later during my travels.

Reminds me of a recent article on SOTT which adds even more information to the benefits of cold showers and includes a nice little pep talk. For folks on the fence about doing the cold showers, this may help you to jump right in. Well at least gradually.

7 Reasons to take Cold showers and 1 that Really matters

Today, I could not turn the shower faucet to the right any further. Victory.

My first experience with cold showers was excited but short lived. Joel Runyon had a blog post and YouTube video discussing cold showers and how to begin. I was pumped and I gave it a try. I tried it, I yelped, I nearly peed myself, and then I stopped for a while.

It was too uncomfortable. I didn't want to replace hot, enjoyable showers with frigid, painful experiences. Despite all of the health benefits, I now know that being uncomfortable is exactly what cold showers are all about.

If health isn't high on your priority list, getting used to discomfort on a daily basis should be. By subjecting myself to discomfort now, I increase the likelihood I can stay the course in other areas of my life that are more important. Best of all, there are plenty of health benefits associated with cold shower therapy.

Living a Meaningful Life

Anyone who leads a meaningful life will attest to a few truths. In order to achieve anything, discomfort is going to play a massive role. Whether you are uncomfortably broke and have to borrow money to put gas in your car or if you experience discomfort asking the most beautiful woman on a date, purpose and meaning come with sacrifice.In many cases, the sacrifice is living with discomfort.

Conditioning your brain to accept, survive, and embrace discomfort is one of the practices that can greatly impact the rest of your life. Entrepreneurs, athletes and other professionals may consider cold shower therapy trivial when pursuing their goals, but don't miss out on the big picture. It isn't about the cold water. It's about the discomfort associated with cold showers, which you can overcome every day towards a greater goal in life.

No Way That is Healthy

If you have heard your parents' conventional wisdom growing up, you're probably not too fond of the cold. Supposedly, it can make you sick, but plenty of studies have showed this to be a myth. The truth, is that cold shower therapy is one of the healthiest modes for your body to regulate your internal temperature and it actually strengthens your immune system. It is considered a hormetic stressor, meaning that exposure to low level toxins can improve your health.

Improved blood circulation - showering with cold water is in going to improve your blood circulation between organs and skin considerably. With cold temperatures, blood flows to your organs for protection to keep them the warmest. Warm water sends the blood rushing to the skin so alternating between cold and hot (as I will detail later) can be a great way of improving your blood circulation. If you are just beginning, it might be best to stick to a cold shower only.

Improved mood - it is hard to quantify mood and indeed it is altered by many things. As my Unbalanced Brain series indicates, there are scientific reasons for many mood disorders. Cold showers can stimulate noradrenaline secretion in the brain, which is associated with improving mood disorders like depression.

Increased immune strength - unlike what your mother told you, spending time in the cold can actually increase your immune strength. Those who take cold showers typically exhibit higher white blood cell counts as well as higher concentrations of plasma, T helper cells, and lymphocytes.

Increased testosterone levels - I'm always looking for healthy and natural ways of increasing my testosterone levels. It's a boon in the gym, it makes me feel more motivated in general, and manipulating it naturally is the safest long term method I can think of. When I heard that cold showers can vastly increase testosterone production, I was even more thrilled. Not only is testosterone elevated during the shower, but throughout the day as well.

Metabolic advantages - from a body composition perspective, cold showers are also incredibly useful. The cold water induces an increased metabolic rate. The cold temperatures force your body to re-regulate the body temperature continually, which utilizes many calories. Mark mentions that an evolutionarily retained adaptation to cold water exposure is a layer of protective fat. Therefore, get your cold shower short and sweet and then get out. Longer exposure to cold therapy is not necessarily better.

Comment: Actually, in the Cassiopaean experiment (Session 30 August 2014) time was noted to play a role:
Q: (Carlisle) In the last session, you mentioned cold protocols as an aid to help fight off Ebola and strengthen the immune system. We were wondering what kind of temperature, duration, and frequency of cold exposure is optimal for this?

A: Ten to fifteen C, and same number of minutes. Daily is best initially, but four times weekly for maintenance. The approach can be gradual.

Better breathing - you may hyperventilate as soon as you get in a cold shower, which is a pretty natural response. However, the panic will only make the experience worse so it is in your best interest to breathe calmly and deeply. Few people breathe deeply so you may need cold showers to help you do so.

Make Your Life Easier

One of my favorite things to do is give actionable tips to get started. In this case, making it easier to take cold showers may be against the principle of increasing your acceptance of discomfort, but I'm going to give you some tips and practices anyway.

Big goals require discomfort to achieve - as soon as you make the realization that the goals you want to achieve most in your life are subject to discomfort, it should be an easy sell. The difference between making a good impression, standing your ground, and being successful could be altered by getting used to discomfort.

Joel's TEDx talk compares his decision to strike out as an entrepreneur to the experiences felt during a cold shower. It isn't going to be fun, it might be a bit scary, to many it seems stupid, but it's all a matter of discomfort.

It starts with day 1 - when I first considered cold showers one of my biggest fears was "for how long?" Do I need to take cold showers for the rest of my life? If you think about it, you will never get there. Just take it a day at a time. Get in the cold shower one day for a few minutes, get out, and you will be fine. Then do it the next day. It will get easier and easier so long as you can maintain the practice.

Don't try it gradually - unless you have health problems, I would not try to go from hot to cold over the course of your shower. In my experience, I forgot to get cold a lot of the times, in the hot water it is easy to talk yourself out of a cold shower, and partial immersion into cold shower therapy just doesn't seem to work. It might work for you, but based on my experience it is not an effective method.

[Note: it does work for me - lukewarm water to full on cold, but see for yourself what works best]

Work up a sweat first - I have the advantage of living in Austin, Texas so cold showers can be actually quite nice after the scorching heat of the southern United States. Nonetheless, you can even do this in colder climates by doing rigorous exercise or working up some sweat before you get in. It's a great way to cool off and it can also help prevent muscle soreness and fatigue after heavy weight lifting sessions.

Focus on your breath - you're going to get panicked, but it will only make things worse. Taking a cold shower is like quicksand. The faster you can accept what is happening and embrace it, the faster you can recover from the shock. This is one of the reasons I find cold shower therapy to be incredibly meditative. With maximum stimulation all around you, it is your job to maintain a steady focus and calmness with your breath and your focus. It helps to show how much you can actually block out with your mental capabilities. Now think about using this in an uncomfortable setting outside of the shower. Pretty helpful, huh?

What Are You Waiting For?

If you are dedicated to your aspirations and goals, taking a cold shower has profound tangible and mental benefits. Not only do you increase your physical health by taking cold showers, but you will build mental toughness in the face of extreme discomfort. By building discomfort resistance over many years, you will be ready when you need to be. Whether you are an athlete or an entrepreneur or anything that requires you to face and conquer fear, a cold shower is an easy win in the right direction.

And this video: _http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlHZOb5Obbo

Every morning when I take my cold shower I say to myself: I am not alone in this. Give strenght to endure this cold water.

Now the water is colder, it is automne here. If you take a shower very early in the morning you can have cold water. Fantastic. But it is hard, and makes our bodies hard also. I feel better, not just because of the showers but because I know it is something that is good for my mind and body. It is a gift we give to our bodies, a sort of armour. Interior and exterior armour.

The article about the 7 reasons to take a cold shower also helped me very much to understand that sometimes you have to suffer a little for the good reason.
 

herondancer

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Has anyone had an emotional reaction cold showers/baths (other than "yikes!")? I've been taking baths at 19/20C which seems to be enough to get me shivering withing 2 minutes (one of the skinny ones here). I usually take a book to distract myself for the 20 min. The last one was strange because as soon as I eased into the water I got very emotionally upset, "this is so cold, I don't like this, etc." and then I started crying. I did stay in for the full time, shivering and crying and part of me wondering what the heck was going on.

I had the thought that maybe the physical shivering was inducting, so to speak, an emotional release as Levine has described it. That is the physical action of shivering brought on the the release of some sort of stuck emotional energy for which shivering was appropriate. In any case, it was weird. The next day I was really tired.
 

Laura

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herondancer said:
Has anyone had an emotional reaction cold showers/baths (other than "yikes!")? I've been taking baths at 19/20C which seems to be enough to get me shivering withing 2 minutes (one of the skinny ones here). I usually take a book to distract myself for the 20 min. The last one was strange because as soon as I eased into the water I got very emotionally upset, "this is so cold, I don't like this, etc." and then I started crying. I did stay in for the full time, shivering and crying and part of me wondering what the heck was going on.

I had the thought that maybe the physical shivering was inducting, so to speak, an emotional release as Levine has described it. That is the physical action of shivering brought on the the release of some sort of stuck emotional energy for which shivering was appropriate. In any case, it was weird. The next day I was really tired.

Um... how about just staying in one minute for each degree celsius? That's what I do. Cs said only 10 to 15 minutes... 10 to 15 degrees, so that is logical.
 

herondancer

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Laura said:
Um... how about just staying in one minute for each degree celsius? That's what I do. Cs said only 10 to 15 minutes... 10 to 15 degrees, so that is logical.

Ok, 20C means 20 minutes. I just took another one, and didn't have anything happen. I'm shivering pretty well, so for the time being I'll stick with 20C/20 min. Still not fun yet :umm: :violin: ;)
 

s-kur

Jedi Council Member
herondancer said:
Laura said:
Um... how about just staying in one minute for each degree celsius? That's what I do. Cs said only 10 to 15 minutes... 10 to 15 degrees, so that is logical.

Ok, 20C means 20 minutes. I just took another one, and didn't have anything happen. I'm shivering pretty well, so for the time being I'll stick with 20C/20 min. Still not fun yet :umm: :violin: ;)

herondancer, maybe it will be easier for you take baths instead of showers? For me it's much easier and showers was very painful, but after some baths a could take a coldest shower and it was slighty tickles :)
Water in the bath is still and after you plunge in your body adapts very fast :thup:
 

clarabell

The Force is Strong With This One
http://oneminuteastronomer.com/7954/caesar-comet/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesar's_Comet Hi, thanks for session. Googling Caesar's Comet got some interesting results.
 

Teresa

Jedi
will01 said:
Great session, thankyou.

Yep, those cold showers do take a lot of will power. As others have said, it is best to dive in at the coldest temperature, rather than reduce it slowly. Once the initial shock passes, it's really not that hard to stay in and I am of the skinny type who has always felt and avoided the cold. Doing this has definitely improved my cold tolerance and is a small price to pay for the benefit received.

Sometimes I will cold shower after using the sauna and although the initial cold shock is greater, I was wondering if this would be as effective due to the elevated body temperature? Maybe a longer time in the shower is needed for the same benefit.

As an alternative to showers, if the temperature is cold enough I sometimes just stand naked in the night air. This has produced good results as well, shivering the whole time, especially with a cool wind blowing. And it saves water (though I usually use ground water).

I've been wondering about this myself. Does it need to be water or is it just the cold?
 

flock

The Force is Strong With This One
A big thanks for this wonderful session.
The more i read it the more it touches me and it gives it self the point.
Even tho i have a problem with translation for me this session is comprehensive,pervasive.
I can only say wow.
Thanks :)
 

weasel3d

Jedi
Thanks everyone! Another fascinating session! And another vast amount of concepts to process and incorporate.
 

Laura

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Some months back, in anticipation of doing cold therapy in a serious way, we acquired a really cheap above-ground pool. See attached photo.

Now, the plan was/is to implement the cold procedure every day even as the temperatures drop going into winter so as to gradually acclimate ourselves.

The water was plenty cool to begin with and the warmest it ever got was something like 23 C. Right about now, it is hovering around 17/18 degrees though a week ago it was 16.5. The weather is beginning to cool down and we expect some really frigid dips very soon.

Anyway, what I noticed is this: the important thing seems to be the all-over body shock that activates all kinds of mechanisms within. I started out being really hesitant about immersing myself fully. I tried all kinds of tricks to work my way into it, but in the end, I found that the shock is what is wanted because that is what heats you up pretty fast. Within 3 minutes, I can feel the heater turn on inside. So I know that if I just get in there, EMBRACE the cold water fully and immediately, revel in the shock, I'll be warm in a minute or two.

Also, doing this has brought interesting realizations: it is better when it is colder. The few days it was running around 16 degrees, the heater turned on faster and stronger. After the heater turns on, the water feels incredibly GOOD. I just sort of dog paddle around in circles to keep the cold water flowing on me and it produces a sensation of well-being that is hard to describe. I find myself becoming addicted to it! And this is crazy for a person who grew up in Florida and really, really, hated the cold!

I also notice that all my leg swelling is gone and even my varicose veins seem to be diminishing. My skin, overall, is much improved and I've stopped getting those weird old-age bruises on my arms. Even my little brown spots on the hands are fading.

It's been going down to 11 C for the past couple of nights and I expect it to be pretty cool when I go out there for my morning dip in about half an hour.

So, for those of you who are able and in the right environment, a small above-ground swimming pool might be the solution. There is a pump and sand filter and you can conserve water this way. They aren't deep, so you have to "sit down" in them, but if there are several people involved, all of you can get in at once if wanted.

There's just NOTHING quite like that instant, whole body envelopment in cold water.
 

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Ollie

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Teresa said:
will01 said:
Great session, thankyou.

Yep, those cold showers do take a lot of will power. As others have said, it is best to dive in at the coldest temperature, rather than reduce it slowly. Once the initial shock passes, it's really not that hard to stay in and I am of the skinny type who has always felt and avoided the cold. Doing this has definitely improved my cold tolerance and is a small price to pay for the benefit received.

Sometimes I will cold shower after using the sauna and although the initial cold shock is greater, I was wondering if this would be as effective due to the elevated body temperature? Maybe a longer time in the shower is needed for the same benefit.

As an alternative to showers, if the temperature is cold enough I sometimes just stand naked in the night air. This has produced good results as well, shivering the whole time, especially with a cool wind blowing. And it saves water (though I usually use ground water).

I've been wondering about this myself. Does it need to be water or is it just the cold?
According to Dr Jack Kruse, water adaption is the fastest way to do it, just 'adapting' in the air takes considerably longer.

Laura said:
...

...I found that the shock is what is wanted because that is what heats you up pretty fast. Within 3 minutes, I can feel the heater turn on inside. So I know that if I just get in there, EMBRACE the cold water fully and immediately, revel in the shock, I'll be warm in a minute or two.

Also, doing this has brought interesting realizations: it is better when it is colder. ... After the heater turns on, the water feels incredibly GOOD. ...

I also notice that all my leg swelling is gone and even my varicose veins seem to be diminishing. My skin, overall, is much improved and I've stopped getting those weird old-age bruises on my arms. Even my little brown spots on the hands are fading.
...

There's just NOTHING quite like that instant, whole body envelopment in cold water.

That has been my experience too in a 15C spring pool. Even the 'tingling' that I previously felt in my feet has reduced to almost nothing. :) Cold water adaption rocks! :rockon:
 

Flow

Padawan Learner
Thank you so much for the session! :)


(PoB) This full tribal unit strength that affects progress and changes DNA and so on, does it happen progressively, or is it like yes or no?

(L) You mean like on or off?

(PoB) Yes.

A: Critical mass much involved.

Q: (L) So you have to hit a critical mass before it switches.

(Andromeda) So it's more like on/off.

(L) I would say there are SOME individual cumulative things, but the big changes depend on critical mass.

A: Yes.

Q: (L) So we can each be working on ourselves individually with diet, cold therapy, with our networking, with getting rid of our emotional baggage, learning how to get along, etc. But all of that is really just kind of like preparatory for a phase transition?

A: Yes.

Q: (Pierre) And how many percent of this full tribal strength have we reached right now? [laughter]

A: Not enough obviously.

Q: (PoB) Will we know when we reach it?

(Perceval) Yeah, Pierre will grow a tentacle.

A: You will know indeed!

Q: (L) Alright.

(Chu) "Not enough" is the new percentage measurement.

(Andromeda) We have missing members of our family that we need to find!


I was wondering, is there anything that can be done to encourage more people to join and participate here? Because, as we see, many of them, as myself, spend lot of years reading things here, but have no courage to join because of many obstacles (language problems, thinking that there is too much material to read, fear that they'll be noisy, not sure where to start, thinking that everybody else are just too far from them and so on). Or maybe my question is STS because we have to respect other's free will and understand that everyone have their own pace and will join when they feel ready.

Perceval) Well, does cold adaptation increase your core body temperature?

A: Ultimately, yes.

Q: (Pierre) By how much?

A: A degree or two.

Q: (Pierre) Like when you're sick.

(Perceval) Which might be deadly to specific viruses... It might be beneficial for keeping bad things away.

(L) It definitely might. That might be one of the activating effects of the...

(Perceval) If there are so many viruses around, they've probably adapted to the human body temperature. They've been around human beings for so long that they've adapted to living in humans and they do their thing at human body temperature. But if it's higher, they don't work so well.

(Pierre) At 39 degrees C, most of them die.

(L) So, if you have a higher body temperature, not only could you be activating some good DNA inside of you, you'd definitely be cutting off the access of the evil viruses.

(PoB) Like a constant fever.

A: Yes.

So, if the cold showers increase your core body temperature a degree or two, how it is going to affect the good bacteria? And is there an increased risk of fungal infections like when you usually have fever and dealing with bacterial infections?
 
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