The Ice Age Cometh! Forget Global Warming!

c.a.

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Next week, an increasingly cool Northwest flow will affect the #Isère and the #Alpes North. The snow will subside over the days until Thursday, and our beds should be covered with #neige (possibly from 1000 m Wednesday evening). Menu @skipass

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-2 to 2800m and a stuffy weather this morning of November 1st @PicduMidi


Plains, Midwest to shiver in coldest conditions since spring
By Jessica Storm, AccuWeather Meteorologist Updated Nov. 1, 2021 4:05 AM CET Video
A dramatic cooldown will send temperatures plummeting to the low 30s in major cities, sending residents of the Plains and Midwest scurrying for their coats ahead of the chilliest conditions since April.
Residents of the Plains and Midwest may be grabbing their coats and hats this week as a dramatic cooldown chills the region. This will arrive after higher-than-average temperatures warmed the region for weeks at the beginning of autumn.

"After a considerably warm start to the fall season, a cold front drawing air from northern Canada will finally dip into the northern U.S. this week," said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Matt Rinde.

This cold front will envelop major cities around the Great Lakes, including Chicago and Detroit, while also dipping far enough south to chill residents in Omaha, Nebraska. Low temperatures in the Windy City are forecast to dive into the low-30s at the start of this week, temperatures that haven't been seen since April.

"This cold front will spread some of the coldest weather of the season so far and only felt as recently as this past spring," Rinde said.

Rapid City, South Dakota, has seen temperatures hang around 4 degrees F above average since late September. Come Monday, they could have temperatures diving into the upper teens. Several other cities in the High Plains could also see dips into the lower 20s for multiple nights.

"While this colder push will be considerably lower than recent days and thus far this season, temperatures will actually fall pretty close to average for the early part of November," said Rinde.

Despite temperatures floating around normal, this first chill is expected to feel particularly potent, since residents have not yet adjusted to the lower temperatures that arrive this time of year. Heating costs are likely to soar this week for the first time since last spring.

"The colder air will set up a possible conveyor of unsettled weather through the central Plains into the Middle Atlantic," Rinde explained.

On Halloween, snow and rain were observed streaking out into the Plains, impacting mainly western South Dakota and Nebraska. Then, precipitation expanded farther into Nebraska and Colorado on Halloween night.

The snow will likely taper off to a few chilly rain showers on Monday as the area of unsettled weather shifts into the Midwest.

Farther south, rain will likely begin to blossom by Tuesday in the southern Plains, before becoming more widespread by midweek.

"The most intense precipitation and thunderstorm potential exists in the southern Plains to lower Mississippi Valley, especially on Wednesday, which will raise concerns for localized flash flooding," said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Tyler Roys.

Much of the northern Plains and Upper Midwest will likely be shielded from precipitation as a dip in the jet stream steers the storm around to the Northeast instead, but areas by the Great Lakes should keep an eye out this week.

"It is that time of year where these systems have the potential for some decent snowfall due to the available moisture during the fall months," Rinde added.

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Despite temperatures floating around normal, this first chill is expected to feel particularly potent, since residents have not yet adjusted to the lower temperatures that arrive this time of year. Heating costs are likely to soar this week for the first time since last spring.

"The colder air will set up a possible conveyor of unsettled weather through the central Plains into the Middle Atlantic," Rinde explained.

This flow, in combination with the cold air in place over the Great Lakes, can also cause some lake-effect snow, especially off the northwestern Great Lakes.

"Some of this snow could accumulate in the overnight hours," added Roys.

As the week comes to a close, the potential for storms continues across the region, especially in southern areas.

"There is the potential for another round of enhanced precipitation across the southern Plains, Gulf Coast and Southeast this weekend as a storm tracks eastward," said Roys.

Authored by CJ Hopkins via The Consent Factory, Snip Last Paragraph: Sunday, Oct 31, 2021 - 11:30 PM
Winter is coming … and you know what that means.
And so on. I think you get the picture. This Winter is probably going to get a little nutty … or, OK, more than a little nutty. In terms of manufactured mass hysteria, it is probably going to make Russiagate, the War on Populism, the Global War on Terror, the Red Scare, and every other manufactured mass-hysteria campaign you can possibly think of look like an amateur production of Wagner’s Götterdammerung.

In other words, kiss reality (or whatever is left of reality at this point) goodbye. The clock is ticking, and GloboCap knows it. If they expect to pull this Great Reset off, they are going to need to terrorize the New-Normal masses into a state of protracted pants-shitting panic and uncontrollable mindless hatred of “the Unvaccinated,” and anyone challenging their rule. A repeat of the Winters of 2020 and 2021 is not going to cut it. It is going to take more than the now standard repertoire of fake and manipulated statistics, dire projections, photos of “death trucks,” non-overflowing overflowing hospitals, and all the other familiar features of the neo-Goebbelsian propaganda juggernaut we have been subjected to for over 18 months.

They are facing a growing working-class revolt. Millions of people in countries all over the world are protesting in the streets, organizing strikes, walk-outs, “sick-outs,” and mounting other forms of opposition. Despite the corporate media’s Orwellian attempts to blackout any coverage of it, or demonize us all as “far-right extremists,” the New Normals are very aware that this is happening. And the official narrative is finally falling apart. The actual facts are undeniable by anyone with an ounce of integrity, so much so that even major GloboCap propaganda outlets like The Guardian are being forced to grudgingly admit the truth.

No, GloboCap has no choice at this point but to let loose with every weapon in its arsenalshort of full-blown despotism, which it cannot deploy without destroying itself — and hope that we will finally break down, bend the knee, and beg for mercy.

I don’t know exactly what they’ve got in mind, but I am definitely not looking forward to it. I’m already pretty worn out as it is. From what I gather, so are a lot of you. If it helps at all, maybe look at it this way. We don’t have to take the battle to them. All we have to do is not surrender, withstand the coming siege, and make it to April.

Or, if the strikes, sick-outs, and “bad weather” continue, it might not even take that long.

 

treesparrow

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
Unseasonable low temperatures in Russia at the moment according to the latest from Electroverse.net
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Extract:

LOWS NEARING -40 SWEEP RUSSIA

As 'our betters' in Glasgow bemoan the impacts of global warming in, among other places, Siberia: "the planet's last great wilderness", northern Russia has actually been experiencing extraordinary lows for the time of year.

On October 31, -36.8C (-34.2F) was registered in Delyankir.

The infamous Verkhoyansk logged -36.6C (-33.9F).

A frigid -36.4C (-33.5F) was observed in Susuman.

While Oymyakon took the cherry with a reading of -38.9C (-38F) on Nov 1 — almost 10C below the seasonal average
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
Authored by CJ Hopkins via The Consent Factory, Snip Last Paragraph: Sunday, Oct 31, 2021 - 11:30 PM
Winter is coming … and you know what that means.
C. J. Hopkins:
No, GloboCap has no choice at this point but to let loose with every weapon in its arsenalshort of full-blown despotism, which it cannot deploy without destroying itself

Think so, when they pulled the trigger there was no stopping the bullet from leaving the chamber. It's all out in the open, a reinvigorated pathology mixing with growing planetary geological tensions, environmental whether system imbalances, and cosmic influences - many types and possibilities.
 

treesparrow

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
From electroverse.net - 11 FEET of snow has already fallen at a ski resort in Alaska since Oct 1st with more extremely heavy snow (12 FEET over 2 days) forecast to fall according to a November 1st youtube report (see below).

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Extract:

Alyeska Resort in Girdwood has started its snow season in jaw-dropping fashion.

Officially, Alaska's largest ski resort begins recording its annual snowfall on October 1, but this year historic falls hit earlier than usual with 13 inches "unofficially" settling on September 23:

For historical data consistency, we officially start recording our annual snowfall on October 1 each year. After the storm last night, we are unofficially sitting at 13" 😁 ⛄ pic.twitter.com/ifaCosrD1E

— Alyeska Resort (@resortalyeska) September 24, 2021

September's snowstorm was a mere taster of things to come. Since that official start date of Oct 1, a whopping 136 inches (11.3 feet) of global warming goodness has accumulated at the top of the mountain (to Nov 1). Breaking down the numbers - data courtesy of alyeskaresort.com— 22 inches of that fell within the last 24 hours, with the 'snow depth' at the summit currently standing at an astonishing 67 inches.

"We got pounded," said one Girdwood local in an email to me.

"[This is] the most snow I have seen in my 37 years around here," they added.

Temperatures across The Last Frontier have held cooler than the average in recent months. This is thought to have been brought about by "much more sea ice in the Chukchi and East Siberian Seas northwest of Alaska," according to Rick Thoman, climate specialist with ACCAP/IARC at UAF:

October 2021 brought much more #seaice in the Chukchi & East Siberian Seas northwest of Alaska than the past few years, as seen in the median daily concentration for Oct 2018-21 from high res AMSR2 passive microwave data, courtesy U. Bremen. #akwx #Arctic @Climatologist49 @ZLabe pic.twitter.com/h5GLghr3So

— Rick Thoman (@AlaskaWx) November 1, 2021

Moreover, and as was the case last season, a lingering anomalous chill contributed to Alyeska holding onto its snowpack into the summer — as reported by climatologist Brian Brettschneider, snow depth on the mountain was still at 98 inches in late May.
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Alaskans brace for a record 12 feet of snow in two days
The snowiest place in Alaska could become the second snowiest as an atmospheric river is forecast to dump up to 144 inches of snow on the Chugach Mountains.
 
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Metrist

Dagobah Resident
About the heavy snowfall...

In Alaska, and other places for that matter... It is often the case that these places that have these exceptional snowfalls - always experience heavy snowfalls. That's why they put ski resorts there.

So, if you see articles about deep snow at Alyeska, or places in California like Donner Pass, ect., it is in places where heavy snow is common.

I live about 50 miles from Alyeska, and there is only trace amounts of snow on the ground left over from our two modest snowfalls. And it is between 35°F and 40°F - which seems above average, but not too far from normal.

As far as cooler than normal, that might be the case in Fairbanks, where UAF is, which is historically very cold, and so that too is not extraordinary.

So, Alaska is a large state with varied weather, and while it seems extraordinary, this news of the weather is happening in places where you would expect it. So it seems a little hyped, given the locations.
 

treesparrow

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
About the heavy snowfall...

In Alaska, and other places for that matter... It is often the case that these places that have these exceptional snowfalls - always experience heavy snowfalls. That's why they put ski resorts there.

So, if you see articles about deep snow at Alyeska, or places in California like Donner Pass, ect., it is in places where heavy snow is common.

I live about 50 miles from Alyeska, and there is only trace amounts of snow on the ground left over from our two modest snowfalls. And it is between 35°F and 40°F - which seems above average, but not too far from normal.

As far as cooler than normal, that might be the case in Fairbanks, where UAF is, which is historically very cold, and so that too is not extraordinary.

So, Alaska is a large state with varied weather, and while it seems extraordinary, this news of the weather is happening in places where you would expect it. So it seems a little hyped, given the locations.

The question can be asked however if this amount of heavy snow common for the time of year (late Oct/early Nov) in the region? (Granted that it's happening at higher elevations).
 

Oxajil

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Dutch weather site writes that the conditions preceding winter are similar to those from 1962. The year 1962-63 saw the coldest winter (also known as the 'Big Freeze of 1963'). They write that in 1962-63 "there was ice on the North Sea (up to 4 kilometers from the coast), the major rivers were frozen over and on the IJsselmeer (lake) there was an ice layer of 80 centimeters that could hold thousands of cars." The conditions are also similar to those from 2010, when the country experienced a cold December with lots of snow. So we may experience another 'big freeze' and/or at least lots of snow. It's just a prediction, of course, but thought it was interesting to mention!
 
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Metrist

Dagobah Resident
The question can be asked however if this amount of heavy snow common for the time of year (late Oct/early Nov) in the region? (Granted that it's happening at higher elevations).
We had a freak snowfall in the middle of Sept., and that was newsworthy because the trees still had all their leaves and a couple inches of heavy, wet snow caused them to slump and cause widespread power outages. But aside from that, the season is timely and if anything, warmer.
Is it common? It might be early, and a little much, but not a surprise. The area is known for avalanches that often close the main highway. The highway dept. often shoots cannons to create avalanches before the snow builds up too much - averting much larger ones.
The area is also near Whittier - a military post whose location was chosen because it was always enshrouded in cloud cover - making it a secret from Japanese planes during WWII.
 

Debra

Jedi Council Member
So now those recently discovered "atmospheric rivers" are going to be dumping snow? Hoo boy! Things are most definitely getting interesting.
Kinda sorta, the term “atmospheric river” has been used occasionally since the 90’s. It used to be called the “Pineapple Express” a name that’s has recently been out of favor. Probably something to do with pineapples being offended ...
:whistle:


During the autumn and winter months the flow of moisture from the Pacific Ocean, via the jet stream that passes over Hawaii, has always delivered a huge amount of precipitation to the west coast. Here is a older non politically correct photo with the old term:
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There was a recent front called a cyclone bomb,stalled off shore mid way between the Vancouver islands and Alaska, and that disturbance seemed to split the river of moisture in two and a large flow curled up, and hit the cold atmosphere of upper Alaska.
At least, that’s what I deduced from watching the pattern over the last few weeks.
 

Voyageur

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So, Alaska is a large state with varied weather, and while it seems extraordinary, this news of the weather is happening in places where you would expect it.
The question can be asked however if this amount of heavy snow common for the time of year (late Oct/early Nov) in the region? (Granted that it's happening at higher elevations).
Mountain areas are interesting, providing such valley to valley vast differences while attracting their own weather.

In terms of snowfall amounts, in Alaska and elsewhere, some areas have very high standard measures for roof trusses (pounds per square foot) on account of this; somewhere reading it was around 340 + pounds per square foot in some areas of Alaska, while Texas might be 20 pounds per square foot, it tells a story - that is over the long run of a season, too. So agree with treesparrow, that those early amounts seem somewhat anomalous as there is a lot of possible buildup to come through the winter.

If you can, keep an eye out up there for this, Metrist. It would be interesting to know what takes place and where. Here is the Alaskan snow dept day to day site, and despite the forecast above, it does not show big hits as of yet, yet localized might be different.

Perhaps this comment in the last session may have crossover with snow:

Q: (nicklebleu and his wife): It has been said that wind has decreased in recent times. Is that true?

A: In some places. Has increased in others. Also it is more compacted.

Take compacted to mean densely localized (and increased).
 
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