Alton Towers, Sir Francis Bacon and the Rosicrucians

Palinurus

The Living Force
As English is not my native language, I have to ask is this "Priuie" here the same as the "Priory" in "Priory of Sion"? How common is this word actually in English speaking lands?
No, this is an old spelling form of privy meaning private. See here: Privy Council of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

U > V is a common spelling transition from old Latin (or French, Italian and Spanish) into their modern versions.

So, no link whatsoever to Priory of Sion I wouln't think.
 

MJF

Jedi Master
Here is the conclusion of France Yates from "The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age":

DEE’S THIRD PERIOD (1589–1608): DISGRACE AND FAILURE

When Dee returned to England in 1589, he was at first received by the queen, but his old position at the centre of the Elizabethan
world was not restored. During his absence, the Armada victory of 1588 had occurred, and this, one would think, might have been seen as the triumph on the seas of the patriotic movement in which Dee had had so large a share. On the other hand, the Earl of Leicester’s movement for landward extension of the Elizabethan ethos in his military expedition to the Netherlands in 1586 had failed; his nephew Philip Sidney lost his life in that expedition; and the whole enterprise was checked by the queen who withdrew Leicester from his command in disgrace.Leicester never got over this; he quietly died in 1588. Thus Leicester and the Sidney circle, Dee’s supporters in the old days, were no longer there except for some survivors, such as Edward Dyer, Sidney’s closest friend, who had been in touch with Dee and Kelley in their recent adventures.

Shunned and isolated, Dee was also confronted with a growing witch-hunt against him. The cry of ‘conjuror’ had always been sporadically raised but in the old days the queen and Leicester had protected his studies. Now the enemies were
increasingly vocal. Dee felt obliged to defend himself in a letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, printed in 1604 but written
earlier.

View attachment 47425

It is illustrated with a woodcut which shows Dee kneeling on the cushion of hope, humility, and patience with his head raised in prayer to the cloudy heavens wherein can be seen the ear, eye, and avenging sword of God. Opposite to him is the many-headed monster of lying tongues and unkind rumour, its heads malevolently turned in his direction. He earnestly assures the archbishop that all his studies have been directed towards searching out the truth of God, that they are holy studies, not diabolical as his enemies falsely assert. From his youth up it has pleased the Almighty

to insinuate into my hart, an insatiable zeale, and desire to knowe his truth: And in him, and by him, incessantly to seeke,
and listen after the same; by the true philosophical method and harmony: proceeding and ascending . . . gradatim, from things
visible, to consider of things inuisible; from thinges bodily, to conceiue of thinges spirituall: from thinges transitorie, and
momentarie, to meditate of things permanent: by thinges mortall . . . to have some perceiuerance of immortality. And to con-
clude, most briefeley, by the most meruailous frame of the whole world, philosophically viewed, and circumspectly wayed,
numbred, and measured . . . most faithfully to loue, honor, and glorifie alwaies, the Framer and Creator thereof.


One hears in these words the voice of the pious author of the Mathematical Preface, rising with number through the three
worlds. But the admired Dee of other days, mentor of Elizabethan poets, must now defend himself from being a black
conjuror of devils.
The implications of the angel-conjuring side of Dee’s doctrine had come out more prominently during his continental mission;
probably rumours of this, and of Jesuit opposition to it, had reached England. Elizabeth and her advisers, always nervous of
committing themselves to the rash projects of enthusiasts, would now be understandably nervous of Dee. Elizabeth had with-
drawn her support from Leicester’s continental enterprise; Leicester and Sidney were both dead. No wonder that Dee’s
position in England was very different from what it had been before his continental journey and that many people might now
refuse to believe that the famous mathematician was a Christian Cabalist, and not a conjuror of devils.

Of Dee’s three periods, the first one, the successful one, has been the most explored. We are all now familiar with the idea
that John Dee, dismissed in the Victorian age as a ridiculous charlatan, was immensely in fl uential in the Elizabethan age, an
in fluence which is far from being, as yet, fully assessed or understood. Of the second period, the period of the continental mis-
sion, we are beginning to know a good deal more than formerly, enough to realise that it had some very large religious or reform-
ing scope, and that its in fl uence long persisted in ways difficult to decipher. The third period, the period of failure verging on per-
secution of this once so admired and important fi gure, has been the least studied of all. What I now say about it must be pro-
visional, awaiting further much-needed research. For the third period is most essential for the understanding of Dee as a whole.
Dee was very poor after his return and in great anxiety as to how to provide a living for his wife and family. A former friend
with whom he was, apparently, still in contact was Sir Walter Raleigh, with whom Dee dined at Durham House on 9 October
1595.


Raleigh, however, was himself out of favour, and would be unlikely to be able to help him to a position. At last, in 1596,
he was madewarden of a college in Manchester, whither he moved with his wife and family. It was an uncomfortable place
and he had di ffi culty with the fellows of the college. In fact the Manchester appointment seems to have been something like a
semi-banishment where he was, for reasons not quite clear, unhappy.
One of his activities when at Manchester was to act as adviser about cases of witchcraft and demonic possession. He had books
on these subjects in his Manchester library which he lent toenquirers investigating such cases. One of the books which he
thus lent was the De praestigiis daemonum by Weyer, the friend of Agrippa, in which it is argued that witchcraft is a delusion,
witches being only poor, melancholy old women. Another book which Dee lent was the Malleus male ficarum, a work which is very
positive as to the reality of witches.
It would seem strange that the conjuring suspicions against Dee should have taken the form of turning him into an expert on
demonology to be consulted in trials, but such seems to have been the case.
The reality of witches and witchcraft was being forcibly maintained in these years by no less a person than the King of
Scotland, soon to succeed Queen Elizabeth as James I. In his Daemonologie (1587), James is profoundly shocked by the
‘damnable error’ of those who, like Weyer, deny the reality of witchcraft. He refers the reader to Bodin’s Démonomanie where he
will find many examples of witchcraft collected with great diligence. And for particulars about the black arts the reader should
consult ‘the fourth book of Cornelius Agrippa’. This was the spurious fourth book of the De occulta philosophia which James
accepted as genuine (Weyer had said that it was not by Agrippa).
James has much more to say about ‘the Divel’s school’ which thinks to climb to knowledge of things to come ‘mounting from
degree to degree on the slippery scale of curiosity’, believing that circles and conjurations tied to the words of God will raise
spirits.


This is clearly ‘practical Cabala’ interpreted as a black art, a fruit of that tree of forbidden knowledge of which Adam
was commanded not to eat. James’s work, if read in Manchester, would not have helped Dee’s reputation.
Dee appears to have been away from Manchester from 1598 to1600; eventually he returned to his old house at Mortlake, living
there in great poverty, though still partially in touch with ‘great persons’.
The accession of James I in 1603 boded little good for the reputed conjuror. Nevertheless Dee made desperate appeals to the new monarch. In a printed pamphlet, dated 5 June 1604, John Dee appeals to the king asking that those who call him a conjuror should be brought to trial:

‘Some impudent and malicious forraine enemie or English traytor . . . hath affirmed your Maiesties Suppliant to be a Conjuror belonging to the most Honorable Priuie Counsell of your Maiesties most famous
last predecessor. . . .’

Note that Dee suspects foreigners or traitors of fomenting the rumours against him, and that he hints that such rumours might implicate the late queen and her council. All was in vain. Dee was not cleared. He died in great poverty at Mortlake in 1608.

The last act of Dee’s extraordinary story is the most impressive of them all. The descendant of British kings, creator (or one of the creators) of the British imperial legend, the leader of the Elizabethan Renaissance, the mentor of Philip Sidney, the prophet of some far-reaching religious movement, dies, an old man, in bitter neglect and extreme poverty.

I am not interested here in the sensationalism which has gathered round Dee’s story and which has tended to obscure his real significance. That significance, as I see it, is the presentation in the life and work of one man of the phenomenon of the disap-
pearance of the Renaissance in the late sixteenth century in clouds of demonic rumour. What happened in Dee’s lifetime to
his ‘Renaissance Neoplatonism’ was happening all over Europe as the Renaissance went down in the darkness of the witch-hunts. Giordano Bruno in England in the 1580s had helped to inspire the ‘Sidney circle’ and the Elizabethan poetic Renaissance.
Giordano Bruno in 1600 was burned at the stake in Rome as a sorcerer. Dee’s fate in England in his third period presents a similar extraordinary contrast with his brilliant first, or ‘Renaissance’, period.

The Hermetic–Cabalist movement failed as a movement ofreligious reform, and that failure involved the suppression of
the Renaissance Neoplatonism which had nourished it. The Renaissance magus turned into Faust.

As English is not my native language, I have to ask is this "Priuie" here the same as the "Priory" in "Priory of Sion"? How common is this word actually in English speaking lands?
No it is not. Dee's English was of an old style, where there was not yet common agreement on the spelling of many common words. What Dee is referring to here is the 'Privy Council' of Queen Elizabeth I. It still exists today as a formal body of advisers to the sovereign of the United Kingdom. Its membership mainly comprises senior politicians who are current or former members of either the House of Commons or the House of Lords. In a crisis, where there was no effective government, they can convene and pass Orders in Council having direct effect in law.

Our word 'Priory' (a monastery headed by a prior) today is derived from the French word 'Prieure', which itself probably derives from the French word 'prière' meaning prayer. In Dee's time it may well have been written as 'priore'. When England was still a Catholic country, there were a lot of priories. However, by the reign of Queen Elizabeth I they had all been closed. However, the name does live on since many of the monastic buildings survived and were converted into residences or were put to other uses. Woburn Abbey, a famous English stately home, is a good example of this. See Woburn Abbey - Abbey / Priory in Milton Keynes, Milton Keynes - Visit South East England. My brother taught at a girls secondary school, which had been an Augustinian Priory and parts of the building still reflect its original heritage. With Catholic emanicipation in the early part of the 19th century, monks and friars returned to England and established new abbeys, monasteries and priories. Thus, there is a prominent Dominican Priory in Cambridge today. I even have a Benedictine Abbey located in my own village here in England. Occasionally, the monks or friars even regained their original properties. A good example of this is at Aylesford in Kent, which the Carmelites bought in 1949. See The Friars - Aylesford Priory, Maidstone, Kent. It became their mother house after they were forced out of the Holy Land in 1242 (as mentioned in my earlier post). The Carmelite General at the time was an Englishman called Simon Stock. People tend to view most Catholic devotions as being Italian, Spanish or French etc. but it was in fact in England that the popular devotion of the brown scapula commenced, which in essence is a scaled down version of the Carmelite's own larger brown scapula.

Hence, to answer your question, most English people would recognise the name priory today, without perhaps really knowing what a priory was. We also have a lot of 'Granges' in England, which was an outlying farm with tithe barns belonging to a monastery or feudal lord. Again we have an example of a medieval grange in the village where I live in Surrey, which once belonged to the now ruined abbey of Waverley.
 

MJF

Jedi Master
Here is the conclusion of France Yates from "The Occult Philosophy in the Elizabethan Age":

DEE’S THIRD PERIOD (1589–1608): DISGRACE AND FAILURE

When Dee returned to England in 1589, he was at first received by the queen, but his old position at the centre of the Elizabethan
world was not restored. During his absence, the Armada victory of 1588 had occurred, and this, one would think, might have been seen as the triumph on the seas of the patriotic movement in which Dee had had so large a share. On the other hand, the Earl of Leicester’s movement for landward extension of the Elizabethan ethos in his military expedition to the Netherlands in 1586 had failed; his nephew Philip Sidney lost his life in that expedition; and the whole enterprise was checked by the queen who withdrew Leicester from his command in disgrace.Leicester never got over this; he quietly died in 1588. Thus Leicester and the Sidney circle, Dee’s supporters in the old days, were no longer there except for some survivors, such as Edward Dyer, Sidney’s closest friend, who had been in touch with Dee and Kelley in their recent adventures.

Shunned and isolated, Dee was also confronted with a growing witch-hunt against him. The cry of ‘conjuror’ had always been sporadically raised but in the old days the queen and Leicester had protected his studies. Now the enemies were
increasingly vocal. Dee felt obliged to defend himself in a letter to the Archbishop of Canterbury, printed in 1604 but written
earlier.

View attachment 47425

It is illustrated with a woodcut which shows Dee kneeling on the cushion of hope, humility, and patience with his head raised in prayer to the cloudy heavens wherein can be seen the ear, eye, and avenging sword of God. Opposite to him is the many-headed monster of lying tongues and unkind rumour, its heads malevolently turned in his direction. He earnestly assures the archbishop that all his studies have been directed towards searching out the truth of God, that they are holy studies, not diabolical as his enemies falsely assert. From his youth up it has pleased the Almighty

to insinuate into my hart, an insatiable zeale, and desire to knowe his truth: And in him, and by him, incessantly to seeke,
and listen after the same; by the true philosophical method and harmony: proceeding and ascending . . . gradatim, from things
visible, to consider of things inuisible; from thinges bodily, to conceiue of thinges spirituall: from thinges transitorie, and
momentarie, to meditate of things permanent: by thinges mortall . . . to have some perceiuerance of immortality. And to con-
clude, most briefeley, by the most meruailous frame of the whole world, philosophically viewed, and circumspectly wayed,
numbred, and measured . . . most faithfully to loue, honor, and glorifie alwaies, the Framer and Creator thereof.


One hears in these words the voice of the pious author of the Mathematical Preface, rising with number through the three
worlds. But the admired Dee of other days, mentor of Elizabethan poets, must now defend himself from being a black
conjuror of devils.
The implications of the angel-conjuring side of Dee’s doctrine had come out more prominently during his continental mission;
probably rumours of this, and of Jesuit opposition to it, had reached England. Elizabeth and her advisers, always nervous of
committing themselves to the rash projects of enthusiasts, would now be understandably nervous of Dee. Elizabeth had with-
drawn her support from Leicester’s continental enterprise; Leicester and Sidney were both dead. No wonder that Dee’s
position in England was very different from what it had been before his continental journey and that many people might now
refuse to believe that the famous mathematician was a Christian Cabalist, and not a conjuror of devils.

Of Dee’s three periods, the first one, the successful one, has been the most explored. We are all now familiar with the idea
that John Dee, dismissed in the Victorian age as a ridiculous charlatan, was immensely in fl uential in the Elizabethan age, an
in fluence which is far from being, as yet, fully assessed or understood. Of the second period, the period of the continental mis-
sion, we are beginning to know a good deal more than formerly, enough to realise that it had some very large religious or reform-
ing scope, and that its in fl uence long persisted in ways difficult to decipher. The third period, the period of failure verging on per-
secution of this once so admired and important fi gure, has been the least studied of all. What I now say about it must be pro-
visional, awaiting further much-needed research. For the third period is most essential for the understanding of Dee as a whole.
Dee was very poor after his return and in great anxiety as to how to provide a living for his wife and family. A former friend
with whom he was, apparently, still in contact was Sir Walter Raleigh, with whom Dee dined at Durham House on 9 October
1595.


Raleigh, however, was himself out of favour, and would be unlikely to be able to help him to a position. At last, in 1596,
he was madewarden of a college in Manchester, whither he moved with his wife and family. It was an uncomfortable place
and he had di ffi culty with the fellows of the college. In fact the Manchester appointment seems to have been something like a
semi-banishment where he was, for reasons not quite clear, unhappy.
One of his activities when at Manchester was to act as adviser about cases of witchcraft and demonic possession. He had books
on these subjects in his Manchester library which he lent toenquirers investigating such cases. One of the books which he
thus lent was the De praestigiis daemonum by Weyer, the friend of Agrippa, in which it is argued that witchcraft is a delusion,
witches being only poor, melancholy old women. Another book which Dee lent was the Malleus male ficarum, a work which is very
positive as to the reality of witches.
It would seem strange that the conjuring suspicions against Dee should have taken the form of turning him into an expert on
demonology to be consulted in trials, but such seems to have been the case.
The reality of witches and witchcraft was being forcibly maintained in these years by no less a person than the King of
Scotland, soon to succeed Queen Elizabeth as James I. In his Daemonologie (1587), James is profoundly shocked by the
‘damnable error’ of those who, like Weyer, deny the reality of witchcraft. He refers the reader to Bodin’s Démonomanie where he
will find many examples of witchcraft collected with great diligence. And for particulars about the black arts the reader should
consult ‘the fourth book of Cornelius Agrippa’. This was the spurious fourth book of the De occulta philosophia which James
accepted as genuine (Weyer had said that it was not by Agrippa).
James has much more to say about ‘the Divel’s school’ which thinks to climb to knowledge of things to come ‘mounting from
degree to degree on the slippery scale of curiosity’, believing that circles and conjurations tied to the words of God will raise
spirits.


This is clearly ‘practical Cabala’ interpreted as a black art, a fruit of that tree of forbidden knowledge of which Adam
was commanded not to eat. James’s work, if read in Manchester, would not have helped Dee’s reputation.
Dee appears to have been away from Manchester from 1598 to1600; eventually he returned to his old house at Mortlake, living
there in great poverty, though still partially in touch with ‘great persons’.
The accession of James I in 1603 boded little good for the reputed conjuror. Nevertheless Dee made desperate appeals to the new monarch. In a printed pamphlet, dated 5 June 1604, John Dee appeals to the king asking that those who call him a conjuror should be brought to trial:

‘Some impudent and malicious forraine enemie or English traytor . . . hath affirmed your Maiesties Suppliant to be a Conjuror belonging to the most Honorable Priuie Counsell of your Maiesties most famous
last predecessor. . . .’

Note that Dee suspects foreigners or traitors of fomenting the rumours against him, and that he hints that such rumours might implicate the late queen and her council. All was in vain. Dee was not cleared. He died in great poverty at Mortlake in 1608.

The last act of Dee’s extraordinary story is the most impressive of them all. The descendant of British kings, creator (or one of the creators) of the British imperial legend, the leader of the Elizabethan Renaissance, the mentor of Philip Sidney, the prophet of some far-reaching religious movement, dies, an old man, in bitter neglect and extreme poverty.

I am not interested here in the sensationalism which has gathered round Dee’s story and which has tended to obscure his real significance. That significance, as I see it, is the presentation in the life and work of one man of the phenomenon of the disap-
pearance of the Renaissance in the late sixteenth century in clouds of demonic rumour. What happened in Dee’s lifetime to
his ‘Renaissance Neoplatonism’ was happening all over Europe as the Renaissance went down in the darkness of the witch-hunts. Giordano Bruno in England in the 1580s had helped to inspire the ‘Sidney circle’ and the Elizabethan poetic Renaissance.
Giordano Bruno in 1600 was burned at the stake in Rome as a sorcerer. Dee’s fate in England in his third period presents a similar extraordinary contrast with his brilliant first, or ‘Renaissance’, period.

The Hermetic–Cabalist movement failed as a movement ofreligious reform, and that failure involved the suppression of
the Renaissance Neoplatonism which had nourished it. The Renaissance magus turned into Faust.
Thank you for adding this extract. I believe that Laura is quite a fan of Frances Yates' work. Yates helped to bring Dee to people's attention as a major (if not the greatest) influence of the Elizabethan Renaissance. The problem with Dee was that his involvement in necromancy and conjuring destroyed his reputation as a serious thinker and it has coloured people's views of him ever since, with people viewing him more as a magus or wizard rather than as one of the fathers of modern experimental science. His legacy would be carried on through men like Francis Bacon, Robert Fludd and into the Royal Society with Sir Isaac Newton. Ironically though, it was with Newton (an alchemist with many other esoteric interests) that the modern age of emperical science was born that would subsequently condemn subjects such as astrology and numerology to the sidelines as pseudoscience at best or as meddling with the occult at worst. Dee though would have viewed these subjects just as worthy of study as mathematics, astronomy, chemistry and physics. Today they may form part of paranormal studies, which in itself is a fairly recent field of study. Thus the Renaissance would give way to the 'Age of Reason' of Descartes and Voltaire etc. and the eventual triumph of scientific materialism in our own age, which leaves no room at all for the spirit. I am sure if Dee returned today he would be horrified since he seemed to be a very spiritual man deep down, whatever else one may think of him.
 

MJF

Jedi Master
As a follow-up to my post on "It is not germaine", I thought I would add some further comments on this unusual use of the word "germaine" that Laura subsequently queried with the C's. It is important to note that they linked it to a French clue when they said - "Tis French" .

The C's used the term again in the Session dated 5 December 1998 in relation to some stone beehives that have been found in the Rennes-le-Chateau area:

Q: Well, there were some funny things going on in that session where you mentioned it. But, we will drop it for now. Okay, regarding this Rennes-le-Chateau business, Mike asks: I would like to know what or who created this pattern of mountains?

A: Mountains are a natural construct.

Q: Then he asks: about the beehive huts in the area, to which you answered 'not germaine,' and he said 'yes, but I'm curious about the beehive huts.' Is there any symbolism to the beehive huts in the area? {Not to mention the funny spelling of the word “germane”.}

A: None.

Q: What were they used for?

A: Honey production!


As you can see, the C's negated the idea of there being any special symbolism in these less then ancient beehives. I would add though that the bee does have a special significance to Freemasons and it is often used as a symbol in their artistic works and devices (Napolean Bonaparte, a freemason, certainly used it), since it represents industriousness. As 'germaine' might be linked to the Stuart kings and their role as leaders and custodians of Freemasonry and its traditions, this could be a way of saying that trying to make a masonic connection to the Rennes-le-Chateau mystery is a blind alley or dead end. However, I dicovered a further link with the word or name 'Germaine' in the church of Rennes-le-Chateau, which could have more relevance to our quest, in the same session.

Q: Well, on the same subject: did Abbe Saunier put clues in the stations of the cross in the Church at Rennes-le-Chateau?

A: Some, but they are gilded.

Q: What do you mean by that?

A: You will see.

Q: Does the message involve all the stations of the cross?

A: Just look. Now folks, remember: Rennes-le-Chateau is a means, not an end. Sort of like unlocking the trunk, expecting to find the gold, and merely finding a map.

Q: So, when you said 'template, Templar,' you were possibly referring to the fact that what was going on here, the constructions, the name and word clues, and even the events and incidents may have been a model that we should look for in other places?

A: Temples too.

Q: What is the...

A: What is behind your temples?

Q: Behind, in a general sense? The creators, the instigators? The church?

A: Place your fingers upon...

Q: What do you put your fingers on that has to do with a temple? Place your fingers on your temple? On your head? What is behind your temple? Your brain...

A: Which part?

Q: Well, the TEMPORAL lobe... the part of the brain where magnetite is found.

A: Yes....

Q: So, what are you getting at here?

A: We are not, you will.

Q: So, the instructions or clues found in this place, may, in fact, apply to some other location? Is that it?

A: Or to a grid.

Q: Was Saunier aware of this grid?

A: It is not important, the grid is.

Q: What I am trying to get at is, if he was aware of it, he might have put clues about it in his decorations in the church.

A: Who says?!

Q: He wrote across the doorway of the church: Terribilis locus est, or This is a Terrible Place...

A: And some have put: "Biohazard" where they store riches.

Q: What grid are we talking about? An EM grid...

A: Yes. Meridians...

Q: In response to your remark from last week, 'ever feel that you are dancing around in circles?' Mike wanted to know if this was a reference to crop circles?

A: No, not directly!

Q: Then, you also said: 'quite simply we would say, where is Arcadia?' Arcadia ...

A: You need to work on that one. The answers to these mysteries are not easily solved, but well worth it!

Q: The chief thing I noticed about Arcadia was, the Arcadians were the enemies of the Trojans, they were the creators of the Trojan Horse - a huge deception... and the Celts are supposed to be the descendants of the refugees from Troy. And, when Hitler came along, one of his ideals was to resurrect Arcadia, and that Germany was going to be the new Arcadia and destroy the 'old corrupt civilization,' which was Troy. Troy is 'three' and is connected to 'Ilium,' and I guess what my question is here is: just who's on first?

A: Who is on second

There are some very suggestive comments contained in this extract as regards 'dancing round in circles', the EM grid, Arcadia, Troy and "who is on second [base]". However, I will leave these on the sidelines for now. The C's then followed-up on the stations of the cross being clues theme in the subsequent Session dated 12 December, 1998:

Q: Last week when I asked about the stations of the cross in the church of Rennes-le-Chateau, whether they were important or would give clues, you said 'some, but they are gilded.' Mike suggested that this term could mean 1. To overlay with gold; 2. To give an attractive, but deceptive appearance; and 3. Guild, as in organization. He asks: I wonder which definition they meant?

A: 2.

Q: Okay, he asks again about the beehive huts. You said they were not 'germain' and we have already discussed that issue. He writes: were these huts really used for honey production, that doesn't seem logical. Were they built in the 19th century by the agrarians you mentioned, or just used by them? Because some of them are completely filled with rocks.

A: Crystals figure in here.

Q: Why do crystals figure in here?

A: Look to see.

Q: He asks if there is a technology buried in the area to facilitate the workings of the window?

A: No need for that.

Q: He asks: Could WE use it?

A: You could be zapped by it.

Q: He wanted to know why the EM grid was important...

A: See 1954 UFO mapping study: France.

Hence, the C's having negated the masonic connection (germaine) in the previous session are linking the stone beehives filled with rocks to the property of crystals, which may in turn link with the utilisation of the EM grid. However, we also see that the C's are telling us that the stations of the cross in the church of Rennes-le-Chateau are gilded (i.e., painted with gold leaf so to make them more attractive or to adorn or brighten them) so as to give an attractive but deceptive appearance. When looking at some of the statues adjacent to the stations of the cross in Abbe Saunier's church, I noted two in particular which may convey hidden meanings for our purposes. The first example is the statue of Saint Germaine erected between the fourth and fifth stations, which, as you can see in the photo below, is gilded.​

1627052039950.jpeg


Germaine Cousin, also Germana Cousin, Germaine of Pibrac, or Germana, (1579–1601) is a French saint. She was born in 1579 of humble parents at Pibrac, a village 15 km from Toulouse.

Of her, the Catholic Encyclopedia writes:

"From her birth she seemed marked out for suffering; she came into the world with a deformed hand and the disease of scrofula, and, while yet an infant, lost her mother. Her father soon married again, but his second wife treated Germaine with much cruelty. Under pretence of saving the other children from the contagion of scrofula she persuaded the father to keep Germaine away from the homestead, and thus the child was employed almost from infancy as a shepherdess. When she returned at night, her bed was in the stable or on a litter of vine branches in a garret. In this hard school Germaine learned early to practise humility and patience. She was gifted with a marvellous sense of the presence of God and of spiritual things, so that her lonely life became to her a source of light and blessing. To poverty, bodily infirmity, the rigours of the seasons, the lack of affection from those in her own home, she added voluntary mortifications and austerities, making bread and water her daily food. Her love for Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament and for His Virgin Mother presaged the saint. She assisted daily at the Holy Sacrifice; when the bell rang, she fixed her sheep-hook or distaff in the ground, and left her flocks to the care of Providence while she heard Mass. Although the pasture was on the border of a forest infested with wolves, no harm ever came to her flocks."

She is said to have practised many austerities as reparation for the sacrileges perpetrated by heretics in the neighbouring churches. She frequented the Sacraments of Penance and the Holy Eucharist, and it was observed that her piety increased on the approach of every feast of Our Lady. The rosary was her only book, and her devotion to the Angelus was so great that she used to fall on her knees at the first sound of the bell, even though she heard it when crossing a stream. The villagers are said to have inclined at first to treat her piety with mild derision, until certain signs of God's signal favour made her an object of reverence and awe.

The ford in winter, after heavy rains or the melting of snow, was at times impassable. On several occasions the swollen waters were seen to open and afford her a passage without wetting her garments. Notwithstanding her poverty she found means to help the poor by sharing with them her allowance of bread. Her father at last came to a sense of his duty, forbade her stepmother henceforth to treat her harshly, and wished to give her a place in the home with his other children, but Germaine begged to be allowed to remain in the humbler position. At this point, when men were beginning to realize the beauty of her life, she died. One morning in the early summer of 1601, her father found that she had not risen at the usual hour and went to call her, finding her dead on her pallet of vine-twigs. She was 22 years old at the time.

Her remains were buried in the parish church of Pibrac in front of the pulpit. In 1644, when the grave was opened to receive one of her relatives, the body of Germaine was discovered fresh and perfectly preserved, and miraculously raised almost to the level of the floor of the church. It was exposed for public view near the pulpit, until a noble lady, the wife of François de Beauregard, presented as a thanks-offering a casket of lead to hold the remains. She had been cured of a malignant and incurable ulcer in the breast, and her infant son whose life was despaired of was restored to health on her seeking the intercession of Germaine. This was the first of a long series of wonderful cures wrought at her relics. The leaden casket was placed in the sacristy, and in 1661 and 1700 the remains were viewed and found fresh and intact by the vicars-general of Toulouse, who have left testamentary depositions of the fact.

Expert medical evidence deposed that the body had not been embalmed, and experimental tests showed that the preservation was not due to any property inherent in the soil. In 1700 a movement was begun to procure the beatification of Germaine, but it fell through owing to accidental causes. In 1793 the casket was desecrated by a revolutionary tinsmith, named Toulza, who with three accomplices took out the remains and buried them in the sacristy, throwing quick lime and water on them. After the Revolution, her body was found to be still intact save where the quick-lime had done its work.

The private veneration of Germaine had continued from the original finding of the body in 1644, supported and encouraged by numerous cures and miracles. The cause of beatification was resumed in 1850. The documents attested more than 400 miracles or extraordinary graces, and thirty postulatory letters from archbishops and bishops in France besought the beatification from the Holy See. The miracles attested were cures of every kind (of blindness, congenital and resulting from disease, of hip and spinal disease), besides the multiplication of food for the distressed community of the Good Shepherd at Bourges in 1845.

On 7 May 1854, Pius IX proclaimed her beatification. He proclaimed her a saint on 29 June 1867, the day on which a vast assembly of prelates gathered in Rome to mark the 18th centenary of the martyrdom of Peter the Apostle, and he congratulated the archbishop of Toulouse, Florian Desprez, and his diocese for giving the church a saint "so powerful, so kind, and so dear to its heart". Her feast is kept in the Diocese of Toulouse on 15 June. She is represented in art with a shepherd's crook or with a distaff; with a watchdog, or a sheep; or with flowers in her apron."


It is understandable why Abbe Sauniere, a French village priest, might wish to erect a statue of a French saint who had only fairly recently been canonised by the Pope from Saunier's time perspective and was a native of Toulouse, a nearby city. However, could there be a hidden message contained within his choice? When you consider the painting of the Shepherds of Arcadia, which includes a young woman, who may represent Demeter, Kore or other earth godesses such as Brigid, Athena etc, then Saint Germain is a good choice, since she was a shepherdess and is depicted carrying a shepherd's crook - with all that entails as regards enlightenment and illumination (see earlier posts). Also a watchdog is often connected with Egyptian and other ancient symbolism to denote a spiritual guide. She also carries flowers in her apron, which again can signify the spring equinox linking her with Demeter and Kore etc.​

However, this is not the only statue in Saunier's church that may conceal a hidden reference. I set out below a photo of a gilded statue of another French saint, Saint Roch for your consideration, which is erected between the tenth and the eleventh Stations of the Cross in the church:

1627075714594.jpeg

Saint Roch
Saint Roch - Wikipedia

Roch or Rocco (lived c. 1348 – 15/16 August 1376/79 (traditionally c. 1295 – 16 August 1327) is a Catholic saint, a confessor whose death is commemorated on 16 August and 9 September in Italy; he is especially invoked against the plague. He may also be called Rock in English, and has the designation of Rollox in Glasgow, Scotland, said to be a corruption of Roch's Loch, which referred to a small loch once near a chapel dedicated to Roch in 1506.

He is a patron saint of dogs, invalids, of falsely accused people, bachelors, and several other things. He is the patron saint of Dolo (near Venice) and Parma. He is also the patron of Casamassima, Cisterna di Latina and Palagiano, Italy.

Saint Roch is known as "São Roque" in Portuguese, as "Sant Roc" in Catalan, and as "San Roque" in Spanish (including in former colonies of the Spanish colonial empire such as the Philippines and in Serbia there is a church Sveti Roka in Petrovaradin named after him.

According to his Acta and his vita in the Golden Legend, he was born at Montpellier, at that time "upon the border of France," as the Golden Legend has it, the son of the noble governor of that city. Even his birth was accounted a miracle, for his noble mother had been barren until she prayed to the Virgin Mary. Miraculously marked from birth with a red cross on his breast that grew as he did, he early began to manifest strict asceticism and great devoutness; on days when his "devout mother fasted twice in the week, and the blessed child Rocke abstained him twice also when his mother fasted in the week and would suck his mother but once that day."

On the death of his parents in his twentieth year he distributed all his worldly goods among the poor like Saint Francis of Assisi—though his father on his deathbed had ordained him governor of Montpellier—and set out as a mendicant pilgrim for Rome. Coming into Italy during an epidemic of plague, he was very diligent in tending the sick in the public hospitals at Acquapendente, Cesena, Rimini, Novara, and Rome, and is said to have effected many miraculous cures by prayer and the sign of the cross and the touch of his hand. At Rome, according to the Golden Legend, he preserved the "cardinal of Angleria in Lombardy" by making the mark of the cross on his forehead, which miraculously remained. Ministering at Piacenza he himself finally fell ill. He was expelled from the town; and withdrew into the forest, where he made himself a hut of boughs and leaves, which was miraculously supplied with water by a spring that arose in the place; he would have perished had not a dog belonging to a nobleman named Gothard Palastrelli supplied him with bread and licked his wounds, healing them. Count Gothard, following his hunting dog that carried the bread, discovered Roch and became his acolyte.

On his return incognito to Montpellier, he was arrested as a spy (by orders of his own uncle) and thrown into prison, where he languished five years and died on 16 August 1327, without revealing his name, to avoid worldly glory. (Evidence suggests, as mentioned earlier, that the previous events occurred, instead of at Voghera in the 1370s.)

After his death, according to the Golden Legend;

"anon an angel brought from heaven a table divinely written with letters of gold into the prison, which he laid under the head of S. Rocke. And in that table was written that God had granted to him his prayer, that is to wit, that who that calleth meekly to S. Rocke he shall not be hurt with any hurt of pestilence."

The townspeople recognized him as well by his birthmark; he was soon canonized in the popular mind, and a great church erected in veneration.

The date (1327) asserted by Francesco Diedo for Roch's death would precede the traumatic advent of the Black Death in Europe (1347–49) after long centuries of absence, for which a rich iconography of the plague, its victims and its protective saints was soon developed, in which the iconography of Roche finds its historical place: previously the topos did not exist. In contrast, however, St. Roch of Montpellier cannot be dismissed based on dates of a specific plague event. In medieval times, the term "plague" was used to indicate a whole array of illnesses and epidemics.

The first literary account is an undated Acta that is labeled, by comparison with the longer, elaborated accounts that were to follow, Acta Breviora, which relies almost entirely on standardized hagiographic topoi to celebrate and promote the cult of Roch.

The story that when the Council of Constance was threatened with plague in 1414, public processions and prayers for the intercession of Roch were ordered, and the outbreak ceased, is provided by Francesco Diedo, the Venetian governor of Brescia, in his Vita Sancti Rochi, 1478. The cult of Roch gained momentum during the bubonic plague that passed through northern Italy in 1477–79.


Saint Roch in Art

Following the Black Death, especially the Italian plague epidemic of 1477–79, new images of Christian martyrs and saints appeared and Roch gained new fame and popularity. The religious art of the time emphasized the importance of the saint to plague-ridden Christians.

The new plague-related images of Roch were drawn from a variety of sources. Plague texts dating from ancient and classical times, as well as Christian, scientific and folk beliefs, all contributed to this emerging visual tradition. Some of the most popular symbols of plague were swords, darts, and most especially arrows. There was also a prevalence of memento mori themes, dark clouds, and astrological signs (signa magna) such as comets, which were often referenced by physicians and writers of plague tracts as causes of plague. The physical symptoms of plague – a raised arm, a tilted head, or a collapsed body – began to symbolize plague in post-Black Death painting.


Plague saints offered hope and healing before, during, and after times of plague. A specific style of painting, the plague votive, was considered a talisman for warding off plague. It portrayed a particular saint as an intercessor between God and the person or persons who commissioned the painting – usually a town, government, lay confraternity, or religious order to atone for the "collective guilt" of the community.

These plague votives worked as a psychological defense against disease in which people attempted to manipulate their situation through requesting the intercession of a saint against the arrows of plague. Rather than a society depressed and resigned to repeated epidemics, these votives represent people taking positive steps to regain control over their environment. Paintings of Roch represent the confidence in which Renaissance worshipers sought to access supernatural aid in overcoming the ravages of plague.

The very abundance of means by which people invoked the aid of the celestial court is essential in understanding Renaissance responses to the disease. Rather than depression or resignation, people "possessed a confidence that put even an apocalyptic disaster of the magnitude of the Black Death into perspective of God's secure and benevolent plan for humankind."

The plague votives functioned both to request intercessory aid from plague saints and to provide catharsis for a population that had just witnessed the profound bodily destruction of the plague. By showing plague saints such as Roch and Sebastian, votives influenced the distribution of God's mercy by invoking the memory of the human suffering experienced by Christ during the Passion. In the art of Roch after 1477 the saint displayed the wounds of his martyrdom without evidence of pain or suffering. Roch actively lifted his clothing to display the plague bubo in his thigh. This display of his plague bubo showed that "he welcomed his disease as a divinely sent opportunity to imitate the sufferings of Christ… [his] patient endurance [of the physical suffering of plague was] a form of martyrdom."

Roch's status as a pilgrim who suffered plague is paramount in his iconography. "The sight of Roch scarred by the plague yet alive and healthy must have been an emotionally-charged image of a promised cure. Here was literal proof that one could survive the plague, a saint who had triumphed over the disease in his own flesh."


It is certainly interesting to learn that medieval physicians and writers of plague tracts were referring to comets as the cause of plague. Modern science seems to be in denial of this fact but our medieval ancestors appeared to be aware. However, what I wish to bring to your attention is: (1) that we have a saint who has a name that may be called "Rock" in English and we know that Abbe Saunier liked to collect magnetised rock for some reason and (2) Saint Roch was miraculously marked from birth with a red cross on his breast.

What relevance does the red cross birthmark have for us? Well, when we looked at the Merovingian monarchs in an earlier post, they were reputed to have had a special red birthmark on their breasts or chests. Legend has it that it was in the form of a cross. Was it just coincidence that Abbe Saunier chose this particular French saint or was it to draw attention to the Merovingian connection, which would feature heavily in 'The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail'? Is this what the C's meant when they responded to Laura's question: "Abbe Saunier put clues in the stations of the cross in the Church at Rennes-le-Chateau?" by saying "Some, but they are gilded"?

There are other statues too but I would just draw your attention to one final piece of artwork and this is a sculpture found at the entrance to the churchyard:

1627078538622.jpeg

Although an image of the skull and crossbones may seem appropriate in a churchyard, the fact that is also a device linked with the Knights Templars and Freemasonry is in itself quite interesting.

However, we must bear in mind what the C's said about the clues contained in these Stations of the Cross:

Q: Does the message involve all the stations of the cross?

A: Just look. Now folks, remember: Rennes-le-Chateau is a means, not an end. Sort of like unlocking the trunk, expecting to find the gold, and merely finding a map.


This indicates to me that there is a genuine mystery to be found at Rennes-le-Chateau but solving it is not in itself the end of the quest but merely a stepping stone by which one can penetrate to the heart of the real mystery. I also think the comparison to finding merely a map is a significant statement, since Poussin's painting of the Shepherds of Arcadia is perhaps the real clue here and somewhere in that painting is a map which will allow one to find the Holy Grail. If Louis XIV was of the Nordic Covenant bloodline, it would explain why he was so determined to get his hands on the painting and then hide it away.

There is also the question of solving where ancient Arcadia was as part of the puzzle:

"Q: In response to your remark from last week, 'ever feel that you are dancing around in circles?' Mike wanted to know if this was a reference to crop circles?

A: No, not directly!

Q: Then, you also said: 'quite simply we would say, where is Arcadia?' Arcadia ...

A: You need to work on that one. The answers to these mysteries are not easily solved, but well worth it!

Q: The chief thing I noticed about Arcadia was, the Arcadians were the enemies of the Trojans, they were the creators of the Trojan Horse - a huge deception... and the Celts are supposed to be the descendants of the refugees from Troy. And, when Hitler came along, one of his ideals was to resurrect Arcadia, and that Germany was going to be the new Arcadia and destroy the 'old corrupt civilization,' which was Troy. Troy is 'three' and is connected to 'Ilium,' and I guess what my question is here is: just who's on first?

A: Who is on second?"


Where they refer to dancing around in circles seems to me to connect us to Stonehenge in England, where the god Apollo was supposed to dance until dawn every 19 years (the Metatonic cycle of the Moon) and where many crop circles have materialised over the years in close proximity to the ancient site. The Trojans, as Celts, were also based in England. Hence, Arcadia is unlikely to be England. However, the C's responded to Laura's question about who is on first base by saying "Who is on second?" This suggests to me, given the Baseball reference of moving from first base to second base, that we need to identify a group of people, the Arcadians, who moved from one place to another over time. According to Iman Wilkens in 'Where Troy Once Stood', Argo was in northern France. The Arcadians were though the allies of the Greeks, who we now realise were really Celts from various northern European provinces. Could Arcadia have been in another part of France, e.g., Brittany or southern France near to the Pyrenees?

The fact that Carnaac in Brittany is phonetically so similar to Karnak in Egypt, where we now know that Egypt was located in France prior to 2,300 BC , makes me think a group of Celts moved from France to today's Egypt and brought their place names with them. From what I have learned recently, the dynasty most associated with Karnak was the 18th dynasty that included Akhenaten. Unfortunately, later Pharaohs tended to remodel the Temple Complex at Karnak by refashioning the stonework and engravings. The worst culprit was Ramses II of the 19th dynasty who obliterated his own father Seti I's engravings by overwriting them with his own. Moreover, a Temple dedicated to Tutenkhamun was torn down by Ramses and the stones repurposed. Fortunately there has been work done in recent times to restore this temple, which may yield more light on the Amarna period. However, of all the 18th dynasty Pharaohs to look at more closely, I think Tuthmosis IV is the one who warrants such closer consideration and I intend to explain why in a subsequent post.

However, before doing that I would like to focus on the Freemasons and their rituals to try and answer another matter Laura brought up with the C's.
 

Attachments

  • 1627052017768.jpeg
    1627052017768.jpeg
    216.7 KB · Views: 0
  • 1627078512649.jpeg
    1627078512649.jpeg
    114.4 KB · Views: 0

MJF

Jedi Master
Whilst still working on my next post, I thought I should post a final reference on the subject of "It is not germaine", which came up in the session dated 10 October 1998:

Q: (A) Okay, I will. Now, I was communicating a little bit with a Finnish guy, Mattie Pitkanen, and he has a lot of material on his web pages and in his publications, which are very close to what I am thinking. First question, is he somehow channeling through his publications?

A: Yes.

Q: (A) Who is he channeling?

A: All the masters have channeled, whether aware or not. The "who" is not Germaine.

By saying "The "who" is not Germaine" are the C's telling us that the channelling of knowledge is not just the preserve of the Rosicrucians/Illuminati and men like Count Saint-Germaine, who most likely channelled 4D STS, but can apply to others too who may be unwittingly channelling other sources? I assume here that Mattie Pitkanen is a scientist. It has been alleged, particularly by Ancient Alien theorists, that many great scientific minds unwittingly channelled some of their ideas from hyperdimensional beings or the Akashic Records. This list includes people such as Leonardo da Vinci, Nikola Tesla, Albert Einstein, Wernher von Braun and Steve Jobs to name but a few. Tesla admitted to seeing his inventions in his mind in three dimensions and was able to turn them around in his mind to see them from different perspectives. Eisntein carried out all his experiments as thought experiments in his mind. He admitted to going into an alpha state often when doing so. Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple who launched the IPhone and IPad, amongst other things, admitted to using Zen Buddhist meditation techniques to dream up his inventions.

There was also the Indian mathematican Srinivasa Ramanujan (22 December 1887 – 26 April 1920). Though he had almost no formal training in pure mathematics, he made substantial contributions to mathematical analysis, number theory, infinite series, and continued fractions, including solutions to mathematical problems then considered unsolvable. Ramanujan initially developed his own mathematical research in isolation: according to Hans Eysenck: "He tried to interest the leading professional mathematicians in his work, but failed for the most part. What he had to show them was too novel, too unfamiliar, and additionally presented in unusual ways; they could not be bothered". Seeking mathematicians who could better understand his work, in 1913 he began a postal correspondence with the English mathematician G. H. Hardy at the University of Cambridge in England. Recognizing Ramanujan's work as extraordinary, Hardy arranged for him to travel to Cambridge. In his notes, Hardy commented that Ramanujan had produced groundbreaking new theorems, including some that "defeated me completely; I had never seen anything in the least like them before", and some recently proven but highly advanced results.

During his short life, Ramanujan independently compiled nearly 3,900 results (mostly identities and equations). Many were completely novel; his original and highly unconventional results, such as the Ramanujan prime, the Ramanujan theta function, partition formulae and mock theta functions, have opened entire new areas of work and inspired a vast amount of further research. Nearly all his claims have now been proven correct. The Ramanujan Journal, a scientific journal, was established to publish work in all areas of mathematics influenced by Ramanujan, and his notebooks—containing summaries of his published and unpublished results—have been analysed and studied for decades since his death as a source of new mathematical ideas. As late as 2012, researchers continued to discover that mere comments in his writings about "simple properties" and "similar outputs" for certain findings were themselves profound and subtle number theory results that remained unsuspected until nearly a century after his death. He became one of the youngest Fellows of the Royal Society and only the second Indian member, and the first Indian to be elected a Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge. Of his original letters, Hardy stated that a single look was enough to show they could have been written only by a mathematician of the highest calibre, comparing Ramanujan to mathematical geniuses such as Euler and Jacobi.

A deeply religious Hindu, Ramanujan credited his substantial mathematical capacities to divinity, and said the mathematical knowledge he displayed was revealed to him by his family goddess Namagiri Thayar (Goddess Mahalakshmi). He looked to her for inspiration in his work and had visions of scrolls of complex mathematical content unfolding before his eyes. He once said, "An equation for me has no meaning unless it expresses a thought of God". See Srinivasa Ramanujan - Wikipedia

I wonder if Ark has looked into Ramanujan's work? Given what the C's have said about the importance of Prime Numbers, I wonder if Ramanujan's work on the Ramanujan prime might yield interesting results when studied.

Hence, I suspect this is what the C's were referring to when they said "All the masters have channeled, whether aware or not". One could even add non-scientists to this list such as Edgar Cayce and even theologians such as Saint Thomas Aquinas (who was an alchemist as well).

Thomas Aquinas never finished his greatest work the Summa Theologica — the summary of theology and his masterwork - after he had an awe inspiring vision. While saying mass on December 6, 1273, the noble-minded philosopher experienced a heavenly vision in which he saw all sorts of truths cascading down around him. In this vision, God revealed to Thomas that all his efforts to describe Him fell so far short he resolved to never write again. Thus, afterwards he said: "I can do no more; such things have been revealed to me that all that I have written seems to me as so much straw.” He stopped writing altogether, leaving his Summa Theologica incomplete. See the article Thomas Aquinas -. In stating that Thomas was much concerned with explaining how angels speak and move, this would seem to suggest that he had some things in common with John Dee, who was obsessed with learning the heavenly language of the angels. Aquinas’s monumental contribution was to teach Western European civilisation that any human being – not just a Christian – could have access to great truths whenever they made use of God’s greatest gift to human beings: reason. He therefore broke a logjam in Christian thinking, the question of how non-Christians could have both wisdom and at the same time no interest in, or even knowledge of, Jesus. He universalised intelligence and opened the Christian mind to the insights of all of humanity from across the ages and continents. The modern world, in so far as it insists that good ideas can come from any quarter regardless of creed or background, remains hugely in his debt.​
 

MJF

Jedi Master
A forum search gave three interesting results for Ramanujan:

The man who knew infinity
Hidden Secrets of all existence in Prime Numbers?
Hyperdimensional Politics, (three consecutive posts)
Thank you for bringing this to everyone's attention. I first came across Ramanujan in an Ancient Aliens episode. The most interesting thing about his mathematics was that it was so far advanced for its time that mathematicians and scientists of that period often had no use for it. It is only as quantum physics and other areas of science have advanced that people are now finding applications for some of his theorems.

I also see that you unearthed yet another possible reference to 'Zuber' in Jean=Bernard Zuber, see: https://www.lpthe.jussieu.fr/~zuber/index_en.html, a physicist who Ark had referred to in the session dated 14 September 2002 in connection with quantum field theory. If I am right in thinking that the C's also had in mind Zuber in Florida, which is on the 29th parallel along with the Great Pyramid, the small pyramid found in the Canary Islands and possibly the huge Atlantean pyramid 300+ miles off the coast of Florida in the Bermuda Triangle (see my earlier post), this would suggest that the Atlanteans and their survivors knew how to apply quantum field theory in order to utilise the EM grid surrounding the planet. If so, this paints a very different picture of the post Deluge survivors knowledge and their technical capabilities, for this would support suggestions that the Great Pyramid of Giza was an extremely advanced piece of engineering in the manner that Christopher Dunn, Dr. Joseph Farrell and others have proposed.
 

moyal

Jedi
I would add though that the bee does have a special significance to Freemasons and it is often used as a symbol in their artistic works and devices (Napolean Bonaparte, a freemason, certainly used it), since it represents industriousness.
I would like to take this opportunity to draw your attention once again to the series of articles "Ancient Spooks I-V", by a certain "Garry", published by Miles Mathis on his website. Part 1 in particular has some interesting theories regarding the bee symbol in occult contexts. Napoleon also makes an appearance.
-> Updates
 

Attachments

  • Ancient Spooks part I.pdf
    1.3 MB · Views: 7
Top Bottom