Ascorbic acid (vitamin C)

Hope someone can help me. I read an interesting article here the other day downloaded by Gaby I think. I have searched under various headings and cannot find it again. The article was about doctors going back to the 50's giving high doses of VitC for many and various ailments-Tetanus, snake bites and even radiation. The bottom line seemed to be DOSE DOSE DOSE. in every case. The word of caution was IRON.
My blood test result 13.6 Iron level.
2.2 Serum Trans Ferrin.
24.00% Saturated level .
Am I ok for dosing to bowel tolerance levels, i.e 4 times a day.

I have also being reading up on gluten free bread. Some are made with oils (but not stating what kind of oils) and others with sourdough.
Would sourdough be ok.
 

zak

Jedi Council Member
A note of caution: Those with iron overload (ask your physician to test for ferritin, transferrin, TIBC and iron) should keep in mind that vitamin C increases the absorption of iron into the body, especially in the heart where it can cause heart failure, palpitations and others. Ferritin levels should be ideally less than 80 and transferrin saturation should be less than 40%. If you are above those levels, you might want to donate some blood or refer to the Iron Disorders Institute. A great book on the subject is The Elephant Iron by Roberta Crawford.
This quote of the same thread can help you to see more clear.
Not making maths with your blood results, but only observation with the recommendations of the quote, it seems that 's ok.
BUT you have to double check, because i am not the right person for this kind of advice.
And in 20 years I have only recently had to deal with a doctor, a nurse and a needle all at the same time, I find that it is already a lot.
:-)
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
This quote of the same thread can help you to see more clear.
Not making maths with your blood results, but only observation with the recommendations of the quote, it seems that 's ok.
BUT you have to double check, because i am not the right person for this kind of advice.
And in 20 years I have only recently had to deal with a doctor, a nurse and a needle all at the same time, I find that it is already a lot.
:-)
Keeping track of your iron and donating blood as needed is important.
 
Zac and Laura.

Thank you both for taking the time to reply to me. My doctor is a slip of a thing who does not want to give me a printout of results(everyone might want one)so as you can imagine my confidence does not run high. I cannot give blood as my veins are to small
so just arming myself in case I might have Iron Overload and need to find someone or myself to draw some on a regular basis.

Learning's fun. Oh my!
 
Gandalf.

Thanks for that article, Very informative and easy to read, However, all articles on this subject, seem to assume you have your very friendly, obliging and knowledgable G.P ready to perform intravenous protocols .etc,etc.. Got to be careful not to start WISHFUL THINKING..
 

Jeffrey of Troy

Padawan Learner
Zac and Laura.

Thank you both for taking the time to reply to me. My doctor is a slip of a thing who does not want to give me a printout of results(everyone might want one)so as you can imagine my confidence does not run high. I cannot give blood as my veins are to small
so just arming myself in case I might have Iron Overload and need to find someone or myself to draw some on a regular basis.

Learning's fun. Oh my!
There is the upper stomach, and the lower stomach. Digestion of food (that you will absorb into your bloodstream from the upper intestine) occurs in the upper stomach, from the enzymes.

Then the food moves down into the lower stomach, where is the acid. The acid has nothing to do with digesting food, but is there to kill pathogens (bacteria, viruses, worms, etc.) so they can't arrive alive in gut to set up their home there.

Now I said the stomach acid has nothing to do with digesting food. This is true.. except iron. Iron is "soft" (as metals go), but tough. You need the acid in your lower stomach to break the iron down to absorbable size.

Good news (for those seeking to reduce blood iron level): calcium neutralizes stomach acid. Have some calcium (200 - 300 milligrams) immediately after food containing a significant amount of iron (like beef or liver) to neutralize some (not all) of the stomach acid, to reduce how much of the iron you will absorb.

Since vitamin C helps your body absorb iron, avoid it shortly before and for a few hours after high-iron food.

But.. calcium helps muscles contract, where magnesium helps muscles relax; and, they compete with each other for absorption across intestinal barrier. So, restrict calcium to morning and / or afternoon, and have magnesium before bed.

Nutrition is complicated! :-P
 

Laura

Administrator
Administrator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
There is the upper stomach, and the lower stomach. Digestion of food (that you will absorb into your bloodstream from the upper intestine) occurs in the upper stomach, from the enzymes.

Then the food moves down into the lower stomach, where is the acid. The acid has nothing to do with digesting food, but is there to kill pathogens (bacteria, viruses, worms, etc.) so they can't arrive alive in gut to set up their home there.
There is no "upper stomach" and "Lower stomach" as you have described it, in the human being. Here is the stomach on the inside:

1545651732043.png

"The stomach is a muscular organ located on the left side of the upper abdomen. The stomach receives food from the esophagus. As food reaches the end of the esophagus, it enters the stomach through a muscular valve called the lower esophageal sphincter.

"The stomach secretes acid and enzymes that digest food. Ridges of muscle tissue called rugae line the stomach. The stomach muscles contract periodically, churning food to enhance digestion. The pyloric sphincter is a muscular valve that opens to allow food to pass from the stomach to the small intestine."

"The stomach is not the only part of your digestive system that absorbs food but rather is a part of the digestive system and important for churning food into a consistency that is easier to digest for the rest of your intestines. "

Perhaps you were referring to anatomical labels?

"The stomach can be divided into four distinct parts. These are the cardia, fundus, corpus, and pylorus.

1545652168876.png

The cardia is the first portion of the stomach and is where food content passes from the esophagus into the stomach. The acids and enzymes referred to as the gastric juices are manufactured in the cardia. The fundus stores undigested food and also the gases released from the chemical digestion of food. The body of the stomach or the corpus is the largest of the four parts that make up the stomach. And this is where the bulk of the partial digestion occurs. The pylorus is connected to the duodenum or the beginning of the small intestine. The contents of the stomach move into the small intestine via the pyloric canal.

"Parietal cells, located in the fundic, cardiac, and pyloric region, secrete hydrochloric acid; the acid activates release of pepsin for protein digestion. The acid also kills micro-organisms swallowed with the food."

Recent research has shown that the cardia is not an anatomically distinct region of the stomach but a region of the oesophageal lining damaged by reflux.
 
Talking about Vit. C, I received an email this morning with a link to a paper/interview about Vit C. called "The Most Powerful Vitamin To Kill Viruses" .

So, I joined a copy of the article to this post for those that could be interested by that.
Gandalf.
The other interesting point made in the above article was that CALCIUM was poison and strangely they made no mention of IRON.
 
There is the upper stomach, and the lower stomach. Digestion of food (that you will absorb into your bloodstream from the upper intestine) occurs in the upper stomach, from the enzymes.

Then the food moves down into the lower stomach, where is the acid. The acid has nothing to do with digesting food, but is there to kill pathogens (bacteria, viruses, worms, etc.) so they can't arrive alive in gut to set up their home there.

Now I said the stomach acid has nothing to do with digesting food. This is true.. except iron. Iron is "soft" (as metals go), but tough. You need the acid in your lower stomach to break the iron down to absorbable size.

Good news (for those seeking to reduce blood iron level): calcium neutralizes stomach acid. Have some calcium (200 - 300 milligrams) immediately after food containing a significant amount of iron (like beef or liver) to neutralize some (not all) of the stomach acid, to reduce how much of the iron you will absorb.

Since vitamin C helps your body absorb iron, avoid it shortly before and for a few hours after high-iron food.

But.. calcium helps muscles contract, where magnesium helps muscles relax; and, they compete with each other for absorption across intestinal barrier. So, restrict calcium to morning and / or afternoon, and have magnesium before bed.

Nutrition is complicated! :-P
Hello Jeffrey of Troy.
Thanks for your info. Greatly appreciated especially about the magnesium. Laura advised me on that way back in Feb'16. The CALCIUM I will totally restrict. You are totally correct -Nutrition is complicated but only because we never learned about it. Much easier to go to Supermarket and just stock-up. Thanks again.
 

Persej

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
This article is interesting:

Effects of Daily Consumption of Honey Solution on Hematological Indices and Blood Levels of Minerals and Enzymes in Normal Individuals

Seven men and three women (mean age, 31.2 years; range, 20-45 years) received a strictly controlled regular diet during a 2-week control period, followed by the regular diet supplemented with daily consumption of 1.2 g/kg body weight honey dissolved in 250 ml of water during a 2-week test period. At the end of each period, overnight fasting blood samples were withdrawn for assays of blood glucose, blood minerals, vitamin C, β-carotene, uric acid, glutathione reductase, immunoglobulin E, hemoglobin, blood indices and cells, serum ferritin, serum iron, and iron-binding capacity. Results showed that honey increased antioxidant agents. It increased blood vitamin C concentration by 47%, β-carotene by 3%, uric acid by 12%, and glutathione reductase by 7%. Honey increased serum iron by 20% and decreased plasma ferritin by 11%. It increased the percentage of monocytes by 50%, and increased lymphocyte and eosinophil percentages slightly. Honey reduced serum immunoglobulin E by 34% and increased serum copper by 33%. It decreased aspartate transaminase by 22% and alanine transaminase by 18%. Honey markedly reduced lactic acid dehydrogenase by 41%, decreased creatinine kinase by 33%, and reduced fasting blood sugar by 5%. It caused slight elevations in blood zinc and magnesium, hemoglobin, and packed cell volume. It may be concluded that honey increased antioxidant agents, serum iron and blood indices, and trace elements and decreased immunoglobulin E, liver and muscle enzymes, and fasting blood sugar in healthy subjects.

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/109662003322233549?journalCode=jmf
 

Chacara

Jedi
Thank you Gandalf for this great article!

Talking about Vit. C, I received an email this morning with a link to a paper/interview about Vit C. called "The Most Powerful Vitamin To Kill Viruses" .

So, I joined a copy of the article to this post for those that could be interested by that.
 
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