Health Protocol for Mandatory Coronavirus Vaccination

Learner

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
On another note, my holistic family physician is not going to follow the pressure on doctors on offering Corona vaccinations to patients in their offices. If people have to take the vaccine they should consider Sputnik V. (Which goes in line what the C's commented about it last year, and recently again about the non-mRNA vaccines.)

Dr. Bhatia hopes for continued networking amongst homeopaths worldwide to share and compare their findings. Those well-versed in homeopathy might want to dig further.

That's interesting! At the next opportunity I am going to ask the naturopath in my neighborhood (who also knows about Gaby's protocol) about it to find out what he knows.
 

Εἰρήνη

Jedi Master
Dr. Gaby, thank you very much for posting this! My father took the Russian Sputnik vaccine about 1 month ago and he is getting on your post-vaccination protocol (late, but he could not start earlier). He is thanking you and forum members greatly!

He also wanted to ask about his knee condition that he currently has: deforming osteoarthritis 3rd degree, chondromalacia 4th degree, synovitis. He doesn't have time for the t-cell therapy. He hopes maybe there is a way to improve his condition by taking certain supplements or medications. What would you recommend?
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
He also wanted to ask about his knee condition that he currently has: deforming osteoarthritis 3rd degree, chondromalacia 4th degree, synovitis. He doesn't have time for the t-cell therapy. He hopes maybe there is a way to improve his condition by taking certain supplements or medications. What would you recommend?
He could try taking some collagen orally, some people respond very well. At that degree of degeneration, a poultice with help to sooth the joint. With acute injuries when his knee is swollen, an ice pack will help reduce the inflammation, but for chronic maintenance without any added injuries, a warm poultice will be very helpful. There's a horse poultice containing salicylic acid in the U.S. that is very well favored for human use.

If he also has access to mesotherapy for osteoarthritis that will also help a lot. The access to this therapy varies a lot from country to country, but it's just some ideas. Some people respond very well to hyaluronic acid knee infiltration, which is what conventional medicine offers, other than plasma rich platelets.
 

Εἰρήνη

Jedi Master
He could try taking some collagen orally, some people respond very well. At that degree of degeneration, a poultice with help to sooth the joint. With acute injuries when his knee is swollen, an ice pack will help reduce the inflammation, but for chronic maintenance without any added injuries, a warm poultice will be very helpful. There's a horse poultice containing salicylic acid in the U.S. that is very well favored for human use.

If he also has access to mesotherapy for osteoarthritis that will also help a lot. The access to this therapy varies a lot from country to country, but it's just some ideas. Some people respond very well to hyaluronic acid knee infiltration, which is what conventional medicine offers, other than plasma rich platelets.
Thank you very much 💚
 

Laurs

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
It seems now that the PCR tests as well as the blue surgical masks have been treated with ethylene oxide, a known carcinogenic substance normally used in sterilizing surgical equipment and operating rooms, as far as i understand. I gather, it is thought that ethylene oxide remains on the tip of the swab or on the masks and people are getting a dose of it every time they undergo a PCR tests or use such dratted masks for a prolongued period of time and are consequently afraid of getting the stuff in their tissues. Especially for kids now that children in some countries are subjected to daily tests!

This week i saw this, this and this article containing requests for information to the authorities about the safety regarding the use of ethylene oxide on these tests and masks, but so far i was unable to find any information online relating to this, i think perhaps the authorities have so far not responded.

Assuming for now that it is dangerous, would anyone know of ways to mitigate the effects of ethylene oxide with supplements or in other ways? Would such be at all possible? Many thanks already.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
Assuming for now that it is dangerous, would anyone know of ways to mitigate the effects of ethylene oxide with supplements or in other ways? Would such be at all possible? Many thanks already.
General detox principles applies. As Sherry Roger titled her book: "Detoxify or Die". It's a classical book which gives an idea of how toxic our material world is, and no place on Earth is exempted. It's literally detoxify or die. I would have been surprised if the masks had no issues. Medical material classically has toxic elements. Sherry Roger's detox tips from her book still apply, and we have included some of them in the protocol, and all of them have been discussed in the forum. There's the classical FIR sauna blanket which is among a top favored one for detox purposes.
 

Gaby

SuperModerator
Moderator
FOTCM Member
A couple of items showing how ivermectin has beneficial effects on the nervous system. It's really good stuff!:


A common anti-parasitic agent showed a potential to prevent inflammation and to promote nerve cell recovery — remyelination — in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS).

By promoting the activity of a receptor called P2X4R that is present in microglial cells — immune cells that reside in the brain — ivermectin (marketed as Stromectol, or Soolantra) eased the clinical manifestations of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE; an induced autoimmune disease similar to MS in humans).

Specifically, researchers saw evidence suggesting that ivermectin was “a potential candidate among currently used drugs to promote the repair of myelin damage,” they wrote.

Their discovery was reported in the study “P2X4 receptor controls microglia activation and favors remyelination in autoimmune encephalitis,” published in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine.

“We are witnessing a discovery that is opening up a new channel of pharmacological development for the treatment of the progressive phase of multiple sclerosis, and with it we want to open a new door on improving the life quality of people who suffer multiple sclerosis,” María Domercq, PhD, member of the Achucarro Basque Center for Neuroscience in Spain and senior author of the study, said in a news release.

Immune cells known as microglia play an important role in brain health. They act as a surveillance system to ensure that no foreign elements do harm to brain cells, and at the same time clear damaged cells from the brain. But if abnormally activated, microglia can promote an inflammatory status that, if allowed to continue for long periods, works to injure the brain by leading to chronic inflammation.

An exacerbated microglial response is known to contribute to MS progression by supporting a damaging inflammatory state.

Researchers at the University of the Basque Country, in Spain, found that the cell surface receptor P2X4R plays an important role in this inflammatory process.

By studying mice with EAE, the team found higher-than-usual levels of P2X4R in microglia cells during acute disease episodes. Samples collected from MS patients showed similar elevated amounts of the receptor.

When researchers blocked P2X4R activity in EAE mice with a chemical inhibitor, disease symptoms progressively worsened. Further tests showed that P2X4R increased inflammation, and prevented nerve cells from recovering the loss of their protective myelin sheath.

Now aware of the importance of P2X4R in regulating both a balanced immune response and in the remyelination process, the researchers examined if strengthening the receptor’s activity might reverse such MS processes as inflammation and myelin loss.

They treated EAE mice with ivermectin, an approved oral medicine widely used to kill parasites — like the worm infections that cause river blindness — because among its many suspected, beneficial capacities is the potential to modulate the activity of P2X4R. [Ivermectin originates from a single microbe discovered in the soil in Japan in 1973.]

The treatment, administrated after disease onset, was found to induce a rapid and significant easing in motor symptoms of the disease. These changes were accompanied by evidence of effective myelin recovery —remyelination — as well as a significant lowering of pro-inflammatory factors and an increase in anti-inflammatory agents.

“The results of our study identify P2X4R as a key modulator of microglia/macrophage polarization, and support the use of IVM [ivermectin] to potentiate a microglia/macrophage switch that favors remyelination in MS,” the researchers concluded.

Because ivermectin “is already used as an anti-parasitic agent in humans,” its approval for testing in clinical trials should be easy to gain, they added.

Theresearchers highlight that these results are only correlative, and other “factors secreted by microglia after P2X4R activation” may also be contributing to the remyelination process. Still, they believe that “manipulating [the] innate immune system to promote repair might be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating MS.”

In the following study, they used ivermectin and DMSO to reconstitute the drug


Ivermectin is an established antiparasitic drug that is used widely in both clinical and veterinary medicines. In humans, ivermectin is used in the treatment of onchocerciasis, but is also effective against other worm infestations, such as strongyloidiasis, as well as some parasitic skin diseases, including scabies.(18) At higher doses, ivermectin has been shown to act as a positive regulator of a variety of ion channels and receptors, such as glycine(19) and purinergic receptors,(20) many of which are also present in mammalian cells. Locally stimulating these ion channels at the site of nerve damage has the potential to initiate nerve growth and repair.

Although the peripheral nervous system has an innate repair capacity, there are various cases, in which this process is impaired, especially in organisms with restricted regenerative potential, such as humans. Given the limitations of current treatment options, there is a critical need to develop new strategies to enhance nerve regeneration. One approach is to examine mechanisms in lower vertebrates, in which peripheral nerve repair is quite efficient. The anthelminic drug ivermectin was recently shown to enhance innervation in regenerative stage frogs. Previous experiments performed in X. laevis tadpoles demonstrated a role for ivermectin in promoting increased nerve growth from ectopic eye tissue.(17) Fluorescently labeled donor eye primordia or unlabeled host tadpoles were treated with or without ivermectin before ectopic engraftment on the host animal flank. Hyperinnervation of the engrafted eye was only seen in those tadpoles, in which the donor tadpole received ivermectin pretreatment (and not vice versa).(17) These experiments revealed that ivermectin treatment of non-neuronal stromal tissue can be exploited to induce the expansion of neurons from the adjacent engrafted neuronal tissue. Although these results were striking, it is important to understand whether this phenomenon was specific to this amphibian model or could be recapitulated in mammalian systems.
In this work, we provide a role for ivermectin in promoting peripheral nerve growth in mammals. We discovered that co-culturing hiNSCs with ivermectin-treated fibroblasts resulted in increased hiNSC proliferation and migration. In addition, we found that ivermectin causes fibroblasts to adopt a glial-like phenotype; increasing uptake of extracellular glutamate, expressing neurotrophic factor GDNF, and displaying characteristics of Schwann cells, including elongated morphology and GFAP expression. These transformed glial-like cells allow for the expansion of resident neurons, providing a supportive environment for nerve regeneration. Furthermore, we demonstrate a physiologically relevant in vivo role for ivermectin in promoting nerve regeneration using a murine model of wound healing. Importantly, our results are in accordance with current findings implicating a critical role for peripheral glia during mammalian tissue regeneration. It was recently shown that dermal injury activates peripheral glia in an in vivo model of full-thickness skin repair. Further, it was demonstrated that depletion of these activated glia functionally impairs the wound healing process.(24) Similarly, transplantation of Schwann cell precursors promoted digit tip regeneration via localized secretion of paracrine factors in a murine amputation model(25)
Given that FDA-approved Ivermectin is already currently used to treat a variety of infestations, including scabies, lice, and onchocerciasis,(26) its use could be further adapted for clinical applications in peripheral nerve repair. It is known that ivermectin eradicates parasitic invertebrates by binding and activating glutamate-gated chloride channels present only in neurons and muscle cells of these organisms, ultimately leading to muscle paralysis and death.(26) In mammals, these types of glutamate-gated chloride channels were only thought to be expressed in the brain, and were thereby protected by the blood–brain barrier: rationale that has lead to its deemed safety for human use. Indeed, at low levels comparable to what is used in both clinical and veterinary medicines, there is essentially no discernible effect on these types of mammalian brain-specific glutamate-gated chloride channels. It has been shown, however, that ivermectin at higher concentrations (i.e., micromolar range) can act as an allosteric modulator of multiple channels, including the human glycine receptor;(19) γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors from chicken,(27) rodents,(28) and humans;(29) chicken and human α7 nicotinic receptors;(30) as well as human purinergic receptors P2X4(20) and P2X7.(31) Many of these receptors are found in multiple cell types in mammals and more specifically humans, suggesting that the effects of ivermectin may be more widespread than initially realized.
Within the microenvironment of a healing wound, there are multiple cell types involved in the healing process, many of which are known to express a number of relevant ion channels. For example, human fibroblasts have been shown to express many of the aforementioned receptors, such as glycine,(32) GABA,(33) purinergic,(34) and nicotinic.(35) This endogenous expression combined with the relatively nonspecific binding and functioning of ivermectin on a variety of different ion channels and receptors makes it somewhat challenging to identify which specific receptor or receptors ivermectin is acting upon in our in vitro and in vivo systems. This complexity of potential interactions of ivermectin with multiple channels and receptors limits insight into mode of action. However, the findings here provide compelling evidence for a broader impact of ivermectin, in both downstream efficacy and potential clinical utility.
Although the effects of ivermectin on neuronal and glial growth in vivo were quite striking, it is important to acknowledge that the drug’s effect on wound closure was not as profound. It is accepted that wound healing in healthy mice is particularly difficult to improve experimentally,(36) and more specifically, the BALB/c wildtype mice used in this study are known to heal relatively quickly.(37) It will be important to assess whether this drug can also play a role in improving nerve regeneration in other models, in which the nerve defect is more profound and/or impaired. For example, similar experiments could be repeated in various in vivo models of neuropathy, which is often associated with other co-morbidities, such as diabetes, autoimmune disorders, and chemotherapy treatment.(38) Ivermectin could also be explored for its potential use in promoting repair of larger nerve defect models, such as sciatic nerve resection or spinal cord injury. Furthermore, because we demonstrate that ivermectin causes fibroblasts to secrete GDNF, this technique can also be adapted as a method to induce endogenous localized delivery of GDNF as a potential analgesic(39) to promote innervation in ischemic tissue(40) or perhaps modified further to develop strategies of GDNF delivery for treating Parkinson’s disease.(41)
 

Voyageur

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
...as the blue surgical masks have been treated with ethylene oxide, a known carcinogenic substance normally used in sterilizing surgical equipment and operating rooms, as far as i understand.
Interestingly enough, and somewhat quietly, Health Canada has made an advisory on masks (Blue and Grey):


Snip
One model of mask distributed to Quebec schools and daycares may be dangerous for the lungs as they could contain a potentially
toxic material, according to a directive sent out by the provincial government on Friday.

Radio-Canada has obtained documents showing Health Canada warned of the potential for "early pulmonary toxicity" from the SNN200642 masks which are made in China and sold and distributed by Métallifer, a Quebec-based manufacturer.
[...]
Health Canada conducted a preliminary risk assessment which revealed a potential for early lung damage associated with inhalation of microscopic graphene particles. Graphene is a strong, very thin material that is used in fabrication, but it can be harmful to lungs when inhaled and can cause long-term health problems.

China is singled out and it is relegated to an SNN batch, however these are likened to asbestos type fibres. How wide spread this is in the world of manufacturing masks, well who knows.
 

aragorn

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
As I'm living in a European country that requires prescriptions for all forms of Ivermectin (also as veterinary medicine), I'm wondering if some of you have managed to buy it online somewhere? I've been trying to find online sources to buy but without success. Past experience has shown that e.g. Germany is a pretty good country to buy alternative medicine – do any German members know a German company that would sell it online?

Another question: I've noticed that some have bought the liquid injectable Ivermectin intended for livestock – as a human, are you supposed to actually inject yourself with that or take it orally?
 

Bobo08

Dagobah Resident
FOTCM Member
Hi Aragorn. I bought Ivermectin from AliExpress. There are a lot of vendors offering that on the platform with varying prices and levels of reputation. I tend to focus on those with the highest reputation first, and price later because the price is generally really low there. Also, some of them don't ship to my country (Australia) so that's another consideration too. Good luck!

BTW, I haven't been able to source hydroxychloroquine without a prescription. I'm wondering if anyone has any advice regarding that.
 

nicklebleu

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
BTW, I haven't been able to source hydroxychloroquine without a prescription. I'm wondering if anyone has any advice regarding that.

I would definitely hang on to it - it may come in handy in case of a REAL pandemic. It seems to be effective if given early in the course.

The picture below is taken from an article published in the American Journal of Medicine in January - as you can see HCQ is pretty much on top of the recommendations.

D409034B-C22C-40B3-8907-DA12ADCCEE9D.png


Also, just to mention it here - there is some indication that inhaled (nebulised) hydrogen peroxide (as in the usual 3% solution you can buy at the chemist) is very effective at treating upper respiratory viral illnesses. I am reading a book at the moment and will post about it if it is of any interest.
 
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