To spay or not to spay?

idiaysan

Padawan Learner
I do not know how sterilization works in cats, I suppose it resembles that of dogs, or at least I know the case in female dogs.
Animals function hormonally to have pups of continuous, if the humans that we take care of animals we do not allow such thing, especially for economic inconveniences and space I think, female animals, end up having very serious hormonal problems. Or at least it was in my experience with my dog, I adopted it when I was 4 weeks, its previous owners were going to sacrifice it (I get goose bumps every time I think about it), now it's 12 years old it's a pit bull Mixed with a beautiful Argentine Dogo, very kind and smart, had two psychological pregnancies (with breast segregation included) that became tumors in the breasts that became complicated, then I had more animals, but when that happened, 7 years ago, it was the first Once I had a bitch and hence my ignorance with the subject of sterilization. In the end were two surgical procedures and a uterine drainage plus a mammary chain, I could have avoided suffering if I had castrated her. Since I could not afford to take care of more dogs. All are lessons.
 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I do not know how sterilization works in cats, I suppose it resembles that of dogs, or at least I know the case in female dogs.
Animals function hormonally to have pups of continuous, if the humans that we take care of animals we do not allow such thing, especially for economic inconveniences and space I think, female animals, end up having very serious hormonal problems. Or at least it was in my experience with my dog, I adopted it when I was 4 weeks, its previous owners were going to sacrifice it (I get goose bumps every time I think about it), now it's 12 years old it's a pit bull Mixed with a beautiful Argentine Dogo, very kind and smart, had two psychological pregnancies (with breast segregation included) that became tumors in the breasts that became complicated, then I had more animals, but when that happened, 7 years ago, it was the first Once I had a bitch and hence my ignorance with the subject of sterilization. In the end were two surgical procedures and a uterine drainage plus a mammary chain, I could have avoided suffering if I had castrated her. Since I could not afford to take care of more dogs. All are lessons.
When it comes to female dogs and especially cats my advice is always to neuter. Especially if animal doesnt have appropriate lifestyle - diet, exercise etc. However never prepubescent i.e at least 1.5 -2 years of age depending on the breed and never after 7 years of age.
 

Ina

Jedi Master
Max, (our dalmatian), was not neutered. He was an extremely responsible dog, best nanny one could ever wish for, very carrying and affectionate. He was the alpha male and female in the house. At Ten o’clock at night, every day he was calling the human adults to bed, Best companion ever, I was reading to him all the important emails and text messages when my husband was away. Jimmy, the Dachshund, was neutered. He has no responsibility whatsoever. His behavior could portray a neurotic mama’s boy, but he’s the best living sedative ever. If he comes and cuddles next to you, in 5 minues you fall asleep, irrespective of the time of the day.
 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I think a lot of neutered dogs especially the ones done very early remain arrested in juvenile state throughout their life and never mature psychologically- well at lest that’s my observation.
 

will01

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
My dog is an intact 12 year old male. He is having symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia, with difficulty urinating and defacating. So far I have been managing the problem using various herbs (with saw palmetto showing good effect), however it doesn't seem to cure the problem.

The general consensus (including my local vet) seems to be that neutering is the best way to resolve this issue, with the benefits outweighing the risks. Has anyone else had experience with this or could offer some advice?
 

Yupo

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
I have heard a case made for letting females go through their cycles rather than throwing them into an early menopause. I can say that my cats had a personality turn for the much worse after being spayed. They went from affectionate and docile to very moody and even downright mean.
 

will01

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
I have heard a case made for letting females go through their cycles rather than throwing them into an early menopause. I can say that my cats had a personality turn for the much worse after being spayed. They went from affectionate and docile to very moody and even downright mean.
All of our cats were desexed at a young age (still developing) and didn't seem to show any negative effects. Then again, we were advised to do it when they were young and always have, so who knows if they would have had a different temperament had they been allowed to mature first.
 

Keit

Ambassador
Ambassador
FOTCM Member
The general consensus (including my local vet) seems to be that neutering is the best way to resolve this issue, with the benefits outweighing the risks. Has anyone else had experience with this or could offer some advice?
Although it's true that castration at too young age carries risks and may not be necessary, I think that neutering is a reasonable advice if your dog has been diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia, and if there are overt clinical symptoms. :-):hug2:

There is research that shows that neutering leads to a marked decrease in hyperplasia.

You mention that you already tried herbs, so perhaps it is time to try something else. It's true that anesthesia is more tricky when the dog is older, so perhaps you could discuss it with your vet.

Here's Dr. Karen Bcker's article that talks about it, and she mentions the following:

For dogs with no clinical symptoms, typically no treatment is recommended. However, in these cases, Dr. Becker recommends beginning a supportive protocol of saw palmetto. For cases of mild BPH, she suggests a protocol of DIM (diindolymethane) and high lignan flax hulls, both of which help regulate estrogen metabolism, which can be a secondary problem with BPH. Other natural agents can also be beneficial, including pumpkin seeds, nettle extracts, quercetin, lycopene, natural vitamin E, and selenium.

The most effective and recommended treatment for symptomatic BPH is to neuter the dog. Castration completely resolves the problem. If the dog has discomfort from clinical symptoms, this is often the kindest and speediest treatment.
Good luck and good health to your doggie! :flowers:
 

PERLOU

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
J'ai toujours fait stériliser mes filles chatonnes ou York entre 2 et 6 mois mais mes deux garçons n'ont pas été stérilisé et n'ont montré aucun problème de monter sur la jambe des humains, Clovis a vécu jusqu'à 18 ans et Ugo, actuellement a 18 ans et ai toujours en vie... Si c'était à refaire, je referai exactement ce que j'ai déjà fait... Mes 4 chatonnes et mes deux York actuels sont de merveilleux petits compagnons que j'adore et qui me le rendent si bien, tout comme mes précédents petits amis décédés pour qui je prie chaque jour, je les ai tous en photo sur mes murs...

I always had my kitten or York girls spayed between 2 and 6 months but my two boys were not spayed and showed no problem to ride on human legs, Clovis lived until he was 18 years old and Ugo is now 18 years old and still alive... If I had to do it all over again, I would do exactly what I did before... My 4 kittens and my two current York are wonderful little companions that I love and that make me feel so good, just like my previous deceased boyfriends for whom I pray every day, I have them all in picture on my walls...

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 

will01

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
Although it's true that castration at too young age carries risks and may not be necessary, I think that neutering is a reasonable advice if your dog has been diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia, and if there are overt clinical symptoms. :-):hug2:

There is research that shows that neutering leads to a marked decrease in hyperplasia.

You mention that you already tried herbs, so perhaps it is time to try something else. It's true that anesthesia is more tricky when the dog is older, so perhaps you could discuss it with your vet.

Here's Dr. Karen Bcker's article that talks about it, and she mentions the following:



Good luck and good health to your doggie! :flowers:
Thanks for the reply and advice Keit.

Dr Karen Becker's articles are the ones I mostly refer to for pet issues and this is a good one for this particular problem. I have an appointment with my Vet tomorrow and will see what she has to say. I will also talk to her regarding the anesthesia.

Thank you also for your well wishes :-) .
 

will01

Jedi Master
FOTCM Member
J'ai toujours fait stériliser mes filles chatonnes ou York entre 2 et 6 mois mais mes deux garçons n'ont pas été stérilisé et n'ont montré aucun problème de monter sur la jambe des humains, Clovis a vécu jusqu'à 18 ans et Ugo, actuellement a 18 ans et ai toujours en vie... Si c'était à refaire, je referai exactement ce que j'ai déjà fait... Mes 4 chatonnes et mes deux York actuels sont de merveilleux petits compagnons que j'adore et qui me le rendent si bien, tout comme mes précédents petits amis décédés pour qui je prie chaque jour, je les ai tous en photo sur mes murs...

I always had my kitten or York girls spayed between 2 and 6 months but my two boys were not spayed and showed no problem to ride on human legs, Clovis lived until he was 18 years old and Ugo is now 18 years old and still alive... If I had to do it all over again, I would do exactly what I did before... My 4 kittens and my two current York are wonderful little companions that I love and that make me feel so good, just like my previous deceased boyfriends for whom I pray every day, I have them all in picture on my walls...

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
18 years is a very good age, most of our dogs live to about 16.

18 ans est un très bon âge, la plupart de nos chiens vivent jusqu'à environ 16 ans.
 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
My dog is an intact 12 year old male. He is having symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia, with difficulty urinating and defacating. So far I have been managing the problem using various herbs (with saw palmetto showing good effect), however it doesn't seem to cure the problem.

The general consensus (including my local vet) seems to be that neutering is the best way to resolve this issue, with the benefits outweighing the risks. Has anyone else had experience with this or could offer some advice?
Castration will surely solve the problem however neutering at very old age has bern connected with increased incidence if hypothyroidism. There is better option called Supralorin - its an implant that lasts for 6 months and stops the production of testosterone by disconnecting the signals from pineal gland. It may be an option in your case to stop the feedback loop with prostate. Or slow it down. I use it s lot in cases where owner is unsure how castration will affect the behaviour of the dog - sort of trial run before permanently removing the gonads.
 

Deckard

The Living Force
FOTCM Member
FWIW i recently learned that in Sweden it is illegal to neuter male dogs when there are no medical indications. I fully agree with this.
 
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